(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The Black Cat Magazine"

5 Complete Stories-5 




HENRY F. MILLER 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE 



Pianofortes 



BOSTON, MASS. 




■PAUL E.DERRKK ADVG AG'Cr 



ATTENTION, MOTHERS! 

The famous French physician.Bouchard,says:"CA/7rfr*»/«rf<>»m*af <>//>» ^ 

derangement s,skin diseases and bilious Aeadaches,and rheumatism in its most serious manifestations comes 

FOR INFANTS.— Boil one cup Quaker Oats in 
two quarts of water for half an hour, strain through 
a sieve or double cheesecloth, and sweeten to taste. 
If you want your boys and girls to feel well — to 
grow into robust men and women, give them, nay 
insist upon their eating, QUAKER OATS. 
At all Grocers in 2-pound Packages. 
QUAKER OATS makes not only the best breakfast porridge in the world, but also 
delicious wholesome bread, muffins, cakes, soups and puddings. Write for our Cereal Cook 
Book, edited by Mrs. Rorcr. Free, postpaid. 

The American Cereal Co., Monadnock Building, Chicago, 111. 



Quaker 
Oats 

FDR INFANTS 



EAT MORE 

Quaker 
Oats 

LESS HEAT 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



THE MEN ARE JEALOUS! 

We thought we had an excellent idea — and so we did. But there was a 
flaw in it. We offered O ne Thous and Fiv e Hund red Dollars for prizes to 
wearers of the Sorosis Shoe for the best fifteen stories illustrating the 
romance that naturally accompanies the beauty, style and comfort of the 
Sorosis Shoe as worn everywhere that fair women and brave men meet — on 
golf-links, tennis-courts, in mountain rambles, ball-rooms and busy streets, 
at home and abroad. So far so good . But our mail came in, and then the 
trouble began ! 

The Men were Jealous. They were not " wearers of the Sorosis Shoe," 
but claim they are quicker to notice and better able to appreciate handsome 
shoes than their sisters, that they knew all about the romance and beauty 
and style and comfort of the Sorosis Shoe on the feet of their sweethearts, 
wives, daughters, sisters, cousins and aunts, and they wanted to write about 
it — and incidentally to win the prizes. They complained vigorously. 

What could we do? 

Nothing — except apologize publicly, and give them a fair chance with 
the fairer sex. 

But we don't intend to have the women put into competition with Tom, 
Dick and Harry. We stand by our original offer. And for Thomas, Richard 
and Henry we make a new offer — open to their sex alone. 

There is nothing mean about the " Sorosis " Shoe or its manufacturers, 
and we'll prove it. Here is the proof : 

For the best thirty stories illustrating the beauty, style and comfort 
of the 

"SOROSIS" SHOE 



$3000 



we offer ft ^fl || || | in prizes as follows: 

To Women, fifteen prizes: 

$500 for first-prize story, $250 for second-prize story, 
and the rest, $750 in smaller prizes. 
To Men, fifteen prizes, of the same amounts. 

Literary people of recognized standing and ability will be the judges of 
these stories. Send for full particulars respecting this competition to 

A. E. LITTLE & CO., 52 Blake Street, Lynn, Mass. 

Manufacturers of the wonderful "SOROSIS " SHOE, now so universally worn by women. 

Every applicant will receive a copy of our New College Story containing fine half-tone 
illustrations of all the prominent colleges. 

NOTE. — The knowing one is now aware that " Sorosis " make her feet look well and feel 
well no matter what the size she wears. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




LAW 



STUDY AT HOWIE. 

Coarse hv mail prepares for 
admission 10 the bar ana de- 
gree truin our ti-sidrnt school, 
Indianapolis cnileue of Law. 
IndlviduaJ instruction by 
scholar] v men. Kl.-.tive coarse* In- 
ternational patronage. Graduates 
practising. Bead for Law catalogue. 

ILLUSTRATING »£3».* 

a/ine Illustrating taught bymall. Adapt- 
ed to all. Individual instruction and criti- 
cism same u onr resilient «'in«'i. . Lest 
methods. Prepares quickly for protiiaole 

Work. Semi for Hookli-l I. 

MEDICAL ■,^ffl^S5..0PTICS 

by mail. Adapted to H.vsirUuis. I'har- 
n'ro'i-is ■mil all home students, [ndmd- 
oal instruction. Elective .■curses. Inter- 

lialh'lial patronage. »•• Catalogue M. 

National Correspondence Schools, 

52 Penn Street, - - Indianapolis, Ind 



LAW 



BY MAIL conducted by Hon. A. 

YViilanl. hue Chief .Itistice Supreme 
Ct.nrt of s..nth Carolina. Send lor 
free Catalogue No. K-K. roiumniia 

(„rr.-i.iin.liMir>- Constr, No. 225 1 enn- 

sylvania Ave. s E., Washington, D.L. 



Study Law at Home] 

Leading School in Correspondence instruction. 
Course leads to IX.B. and prepares for admission 
tollar in all Stilt.:-. Full particulars free. 

t htciiiro t orrrspondeuee School nf Law. 
610 Ilea per Biock, ■ t'lllCAbO, ILL. | 



iQVERNMENT POSITIONS 



8,000 APPOINTMENTS K&E&SE 

'to Civil Service places, and a larger munber 
is pending for 1900. We prepared K ¥ 
>l \ 1 1, li large per cent of the successful ones 
tin the examination, and (lie lucky onesot IsnjO 
will he hugely those whom we assist. Let usassist you. 

%ISSuVSSia58 , lftl*ii COH.W* t» Penn- 
sylvuina Avenue S. E., Washington, 1>. C. 

REPORTERS WANTED &£g%L7K 

111:1 il. .luiuiialists l'ublishing l.'o..li.ttW. Allegheny, l'a. 



If you do we can be of assist- 
ance to you. Few publishers 
have tune "o read your M88. We have. That is our 
, siness. We make a specialty of giving estimates of 
literary work, you will lind our ratesreasonable. Send 

for them. Address, 

International Manuscri pt Bureau, Station A, Washington, U.b. 

to write Hooks. Highest 
Royalties paid to authors or 
Novels. Flays, Ulusic Re- 
ligious. Historical and Scien- 
tilic Works wanted. Try 
- yourhainl 
Publishers, 1368 Broadway. New York. 



WRITE? 



IT PAYS 



WRIGHT & CO 



ROWING MACHINES AND EXERCISERS. 

College and school supplied with the best grade of 
athletic goods. Send for catalogue. 

IHILBBRTBRtK*"'... 

2:tU Sth Ave., New lork. 



DO 
100 




Admiral Sampson 

worked on a farm when a boy 
By study at night, he prepared 
himself for a brilliant career. We 
offer yougreateradvantages tor a 
successful future if you will study 
" between times," through 

Education by Hail 

in Electrical, Mechanical. Sieam, 
Mining and Civil Engineering; 
Metallurgy. Art, Architecture, 
Practical Newspaper Work. Eng- 
lish Tranches, Stenography, Machine Design »"<* Mechan- 
ical Drawing. Low price ; easy terms. The moat thorough 
and complete course of any correspondence school in tue 
world. Send to The United Correspondence Schools. 
154-158 Fifth Ave., New York, for tree catalogue No. 13. 




WHY THE LARGEST? 

Forty -five vears of constant and 



/ healthful progress has put the 



STAMMER 

Write at once for our new 200 page 
book. The Origin and Treatment ofStam- 
nit-ring. The largest and mos fnstructiva 
book of its kind ever published. Sent 
free to any address for 6 cents in stamps 
to cover postage. Ask also for a free 
sample copy of The Phono- Meter, a 
monthly paper exclusively for persons 
who stammer. Address 

The Lewis School for Stammerers 
Geo. Aaftrivlawhi ^ Adelaide St., Detroit, Mich. 



NewEnjIand 

Conservatory 

OF MUSIC 

of Boston .Mass, at the top (both in size 
and standing) of musical institutions 
in America. Comprehensive in plan, 
moderate in price, thorough in practice 
and famous/or results. 

GEO. W. CHADWICK, Musical Director. 
Frank W. Hale, General Manager. Semi tor ai 
illustrated catalogue. 




JOURNALISM 

offers a brilliant career to intelli- 
gent, trained voting men and wo- 
men. All branches of journalism* 

reporting, editing. story writing. 
editorial and political writing 
are thoroughly and practically 
TVKiHTBY MAIL 
Underthe directionof Mr. Henry 
Litchfield West. formerly manag- 
lngeditorottlie Wathtngtm Pan, 
Write for booklet, describing too 

course Nat. Correspondence In- 
IstitDle Cine.) 23-18 Second Nat'l 

1 uaiiii Bldg , Washington, D. C. 



(JOURNALISM 

101 INSTRUCTION BY MAIL ONLY. 

l^. A thorough and scientific course adapted 
to the individual needs nf writers. Lung 
established. Responsible. Successful. 
Instructors experienced and competent. 
Students successful and pleased. Best 
nf references. Write for descriptive 
catalogue. It is sent free. Address, 
Spracue Correspondence Bchool of Journalism, 

No. 89 Majestic Bldg., Detroit, Mich. 




Correspondence School 
^, of ILLUSTRATING 



Home instruction in draw- 
ing for newspapers and ma ga- 
zines by successful illustra- 
tors. Requires spare time 
only. Adapted to young 
and old, beginners and ad- 
vanced students. An op- 
portunity to enter a highly 
profitable profession. Full 
information frre. 

CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL OF ILLUSTRATING 
114 West 34th Street. Hew York 



. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



SCRIBNER S 
for<^s> 19 



"FOB 1900, THE CLOSING TEAR OF THE CENTURY, 
HAS BEEN SECURED THE MOST VALUABLE PROGRAM 
THK MAGAZINE EVER OFFERED." The full 24 page pros- 
pectus in small hook form, with illustrations in colors by noted 
artists, will be sent upon application. 

TOMMY AND GRIZEL, by J. M. Barrie, has finally been com- 
pleted, and will be published in Scribner's Magazine, where " Sen- 
timental Tommy " first appeared. It will begin with the new vol- 
ume (January number) and will be illustrated by Bernard Partridge. 

THE BOER WAR will be dealt with in Scribner's (like the 
Spanish War) with vivid, complete descriptions by eye witnesses — 
accompanied with the best photographs. The first articles will be by 
H. J. Whigham, who has already reached the front. 

OLIVER CROMWELL, by 
Theodore Roosevelt, will not be 
the history of a mere student, com- 
piled with much research, but with 
little experience of affairs. It will 
show a man of action in history as 
viewed by a younger man of action 
today. The illustrators include F. 
C. Yohn, E. C. Peixotto, Henry 
McCarter, Seymour Lucas, R. A., 
the well-known authority upon the 
Cromwellian period, Frank Craig 
and Claude E. Shepperson. 




J. M. Barrie. 




Theodore Roosevelt. 




Henry Norman. 




RICHARD HARDINGDA- 
VIS will continue to be a promi- 
nent and frecpuent contributor both 
of fiction and of special articles. 
More specific announcement will 
be made from time to time. 

THE RUSSIA OF TODAY, 
by Henry Norman, author of "The 
Real Japan," " The Far East," etc., 
and the expert on foreign politics 
and colonial policies. Six articles, 
all illustrated. 



Richard Harding Davis. 



OMDURMAN AND THE 
SUDAN, by Capt. W. Elliott 
Caimes, the well known English 
military critic. Illustrated. 

83.00a Year.Keentsa Number. CHARLES SCRIliXEl! 



ATRIPIN GREENLAND, 
and other articles, by Walter A. 
Wyckoff, author of "The Workers." 

THE CHARM OF PARIS, 

by Ida M. Tarbell, illustrated by 
five famous foreign illustrators. 

SENATOR HOAR: "Har- 
vard Fifty Years- Ago," and other 
papers. 

THE BEST STORIES IN 
THE WORLD will continue to 
appear in Scribner's — stories by 
new writers as well as by Thomas 
Nelson Page, Richard Harding Da- 
vis, Henry van Dyke, Henry James, 
Edith Wharton, Ernest Seton- 
Thompson (author of " Wild Ani- 
mals I have known,") and many 
others. 

ART FEATURES include.be- 
side the uncommon illustrations for 
" Cromwell " and the other pictorial 
plans mentioned, special articles on 
art and artists, such as "Puvis de 
Chavannes," by John La Farge, to 
be illustrated, in color, from the 
great artist's work; special illus- 
trative schemes by Walter Apple- 
ton Clark, Henry McCarter, E. C. 
Peixotto, Dwight L. Elmendorf 
and others. Also color-printing 
and colored covers. 



SON'S, New York. 



IV 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




Brigadier- General 

CHARLES KING 

famous as the foremost military novelist of 
our times and country, is just finishing the 
revision of his 

LATEST NOVEL 

This is a story towards the building of which 
the author has drawn not only on his expe- 
rience in the Philippines, but also on his mem- 
ories of almost forty years in the service of 
Uncle Sam. 

Ainslee's Magazine 

for Christinas will contain the opening instal- 
ment of this remarkably interesting novel, 
under the title 

"TEN YEARS' TRIAL" 

or " The Story of a Soldier's Struggle." No- 
body who is interested in the life of our 
soldiers in garrison and on the field of battle 
should fail to read this storv. 



OTHER INTERESTING FEATURES IN" CHRISTMAS AINSLEE'S WILL BE: 

OOM PAUL KBVEGER. A Character Study and an Interview. Illustrated from Photograph*. 

THE BEARER OF BUEDEXS. By I. ZANGWILL. A Short Story. 

CONTBIBUTIOXS by EUGENE WOOD, ARTHUR I. STREET, KATHERINE TYNAN, 

ARTHUR J. STRINGER, MARY T. VAN DENBURGH, HOWARD FIELDING. 
SPECIAL ABTICLES.— The Balloon Club of Paris.— Irving Behind the Scenes.— Life on the 

Great Lakes.— Home of the Duchess of Marlborough.— Poems.— Topics of the Theatre.— 

Illustrations, etc. 
The Christmas cover is a work of art, lithographed in s<'vimi colors and illustrated in gold. PRICE 10 CT3. 
All Newsdealers, or the Publishers, BTBEET ,v SMITH, aB-988 William St., New ^ork. 



By special arrangement we are able to offer: 



McClure's Magazine 
The Black Cat 
Leslie's Popular Monthly 

Recreation 

The Black Cat 

Self Culture J 



All 3 for s 1 .90 



All 3 for $1.75 



Address all orders to AMERICAN CLUB LIST, SHAMROCK, N. Y. 



UNITARIAN sent free! 

T ITCD A TTT1ST: B * MRS ' HENRV *• MILES ' 

JLllfcKAl U1\E imrHiB, u» 

POULTRY 25 cent's per year. '* months' 
trial 10 cents. Sample Free. 64-pare practical 

Sonltry book free to yearly subscribers, 
ook alone 10 cents. Catalogue of poultry 
hnnktifree. Poultry Advocate. Syracuse, rt. *. 






JACXSOD .^ HOTBHDON, \-w wn< OM It»«k 


Beltan, 




88 \nn Street, Mew York* 






Richard Carvel 95c, postpaid, $1.11 






1.07 




No. 5. John SI 81.10 " 


1.22 




A Rovfng < fommlimion, i»v Henty, 1.10 


1.20 




No Surrender, l.io 


1.98 




Won bv the Sword, " " 1.10 " 


1.26 




When Knighthood was in 1- lower, 1.10 " 


1.21 




Janice Meredith 95c, *' 


1.07 




Payable in N. Y. Fuuds. 







L 



1 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 





The Youth's 




Companion 
Free Every 
Week to 


CAI'T. CHARLES D. SIGSBEE. 


1900. 



More than 200 distinguished contributors, Soldiers, Sailors, Statesmen, Scholars, 
Travellers and Story-Writers, will help to enrich the volume for 1900. Among them are : 



Gen. Wesley Merritt 
Elizabeth Stuart Phelps. 
Rider Haggard. 
Rebecca Harding Davis. 



John Philip Sousa. Margaret Deland. 

Jesse Lynch Williams. Gen. Charles King. 

Ian Maclaren. Capt. Chas. D. Sigsbee. 

Octave Thanet. Andrew Carnegie. 



The Annual Announcement Number, containing full Illustrated Prospectus of the 
volume for 1900, sent free, upon receipt of a postal card, to any address. 



Subscribe Now 

sending $1.75, the price of a year's 
subscription, with this slip or the 
name of this magazine, and we will 
send 

The Companion 
Calendar Free, 

the most beautiful souvenir ever 
presented by the publishers, and all 
the remaining issues of The Com- 
panion for 1899, in addition to the 
52 weeks of the 1900 volume — a 
library in itself. HH24 

THE YOUTH'S COMPANION, 
201 Columbus Ave. BOSTON, MASS. 




ANDREW CARNEGIE. 



VI 



ADVERTISEMENTS . 




The Press 



TheDress 




TheProcess 



■rTHE PRINTING required by some 
^* of the foremost Book and Art 
Publishing Houses, as well as the 
representative Commercial Concerns, 
has for years been supplied by us. 
Few houses anywhere are so well 
equipped to do full justice to large 
orders calling for The Right Kind of 
Work at The Right Price and The 
Right Time of Delivery. 

S. J. PARKHILL & CO., BOSTON, U. S. A. 



TirjlE FURNISH suitable Dresses for 
the product of our Presses. 
In other words, we do The Right 
Sort of Binding, and turn out at the 
shortest possible notice pamphlets, 
books and catalogues in any quantities 
and any styles, — always at The Right 
Time and at The Right Price. 

S. J. PARKHILL & CO., BOSTON, U. S. A. 



Tltl E SUPPLY Designs and Hlustra- 
^*" tions, large or small, simple 
or elaborate, — whether this, that or 
the other Process of reproduction is 
to be employed. We are always 
ready to give to our patrons the 
benefit of our experience and advice, 
with a view to enhancing the artistic 
attractiveness and commercial effect- 
iveness of their printed matter. 

S. J. PARKHILL & CO., BOSTON, U. S. A. 



t 




V 



> 

I 



/' 



% 



L 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Vll 




"sin n Mi" FREE 

BT JOSIAH ALLEH'S WIFE 1 BIA 

" Samantha at Saratoga " is the most popular 
book ever written l>y the famous authoress. Marietta 
Holley ("Joskin Allen's wife"). It is brimful of witty 
remarks, droll philosophy 
and ludicrous descriptions, 
written in the author's best 
vein, and will be enjoyed 
hv every lover of the hu- 
morous. Many thousands 
of the subscription edition 
of tliis book have been sold 
at 12.60 each. We have just 
published an entirely new 
and complete edition of 
"Samantha at Saratoga," 
containing all the text of 
ttie original, in one large 
volume of 374 pages, printed 
from lanretype, embellished with w humorous illustra- 
tions by opper. many of them full page, and lor the pur- 
pose of intto.lu.-ing our popular , Instrated household 
magazine, The l.ndic' W orld, into thousands of 
homes where it is not already taken, we now make the 
following special and extraordinary offer: Own rxml 
of onbi Fifteen Ci'iiU ire i™" «■»•' ' be l,uflie« 
World w Thret Months, and to each stibsrnber ue 
will alto send. Frt-e and post-paid ', out eo t o, ,,r "Saman- 
tha at Saratoga." Tins is an exceptional opportu- 
nity, and places this incomparable book within the reach 
of ail. The I.aiiies' Would isa large. -24-page. SG-cohimn 
illustrated magazine for ladies and the family circle. 
With elegant cover printed in colors. It is devoted to 
Stories, Poems, Ladies' r'ancy-YVork, Home Decora lion. 
Housekeeping, Fashions, Hygiene, Juvenile Heading, 
Floriculture, etc yon will be charmed with the maga- 
zine, and delighted with "Samantha." Five subscrip- 
tions, with the book free to each, will be sent for 60 
cents. Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded. » e 
have been established 24 years, and refer to the mercan- 
tile agencies as to our responsibility. Address : 

S. H. MOORE & CO., Publishers, 

(Dept. B), 

23 to 27 City Hall Place, New York. 



No 

Matter 

What 



your politics may be you'll laugh to 
" split your sides " over JUDGE during 
the campaign of J900. JUDGE has 
politics in pictures for the politician, 
humor for the humorist, and all-around 
good-natured satire for everybody. 
JUDGE'S cartoons are features of every 
political contest that a good American 
should not miss. 

JUDGE is published weekly and is 
to be found the world over. It is sold 
at 10 cents per copy, or by the year 
at $5.00. 

Remember, please, that 

Judge is 
the Prince of 
Caricaturists 



This is the 
Would not be surprised 



"CHICKENS COME HOME TO ROOST" 

(A Novel) 

By L. B. HILLES. 

Second Edition. Twentieth Thounand. 

Ileantifully illustrated. Hound in cloth, 12nio. Now 

ready and sent, postpaid, for SI , •-•>• 

lion. Robert O. Ineernoll said 
boldest and best of the year." 

lion. (Jeorice lt.it t. . : 
if a million copies were sold." 

■Ion. «'. IS. Reed: " A literary gem ; a gift to the 
world of tile ideal novel." . 

H M. I.. Kniisht: "Most realistic and re- 
markable book of the age." 

lion Georite P. Smith, owner Joe ratehen. 
" The horse race in Ben Ilur can't touch it. It is a three- 
time winner." _. . , „ „ . 

Hon. It. T. Wakriiian, Deputy Appraiser Port 
of New Yoik. says; "A great novel ' Great in plot 
character, situations and climax. Greatest 1 have ever 
read, should be dramatized." 

Hon. Win. I.. Stone, A.B.. A ,M., I.I.. B., 
anthorand member titty literary societies, says : U k- 
ens Come Home to ltoosl ' is most admirable. \ ivid m 
description, beautiful and felicitous In execution splem 
did in plot and a great access.ontp America i literature. 

Hundreds of letters like the above. Write for a copy 
at once. 
VVRICHT & COMPANY, Publishers, 

Book llept.. liir.H-70 Broadway, ■« York < itr. 

Also now ready. "WHO IS YOUR WIFE?" postpaid, 50c. 

... and ... 
"BHYJIKS AXD JIXGI.KS. INGLES AMI BHVJIKS 

YKBY GOOll THINGS FOR X-5IAS TIMK8." 
\ Yl other Goose Production, with twelve original draw- 
ings 'set to music. Elegant in style, and just the thing 
for The Little folks, l'ricc ISl.oO. 

Dialogues, Speakers, Magic Tricks. Wigs, 
Mustaches, Music Goods. Catalog 1 ree. 
G. H. "W. Bates, Boston. Mass. 



PLAYS 



25c. 



thialt S / Hy™^ 11 

•we will send 
|| / yoo Demorest's 

Q /Family Magazine 

Vl KM /for three months 

and give you two 
handsome pictures in 
ten colors, exact repro- 
ductions of famous oil 
paintings. They are 8 
by J \h inches. This offer 
of this great family magazine 
is only good for 60 days. 
Write to 

DEMOREST'S MAGAZINE 

Art Department 

110 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK CITY 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



.„..,„ rnrr TDin-rn CIIDnOr «or 300 Annual Subscriptions at $1.00 each, 
SPECIAL FREE TRIP TO tURUrt or commission on those secured. 

A CHANCE FOR A BRIGHT YOUNG MAN OR WOMAN HAVING 299 FRIENDS. 

Send far Excursion Booklet. 
We want you to become one of the 100,000 new subscribers 
which we confidently expect to add to the subscription list of 

"The National Magazine." 



SPECIAL OFFER FOR DECEMBER. 

Pays for subscription to " The National " until March i . 1900. Cut a 
hole in a piece of pasteboard, insert a quarter, wrap in paper and send 
with your address. This includes Dec, Jan., Feb. and March. 
JOE MITCHELL CHAPPLE, THE % W POTTER CO 

Editor and Publisher. 9 » Bedford St., B< 



25c. 



25c. 

an, Mass. I 



WILL CARLETOH'S MAGAZINE. 

"Every Where" 

Only Magazine for 
which Will Carleton, 
M arietta Holley , ("Jo- 
siah Allen's Wife"), 
Fanny Crosby,(World's 
greatest hymn-writer), 
and other famous au- 
thors write in every 
number. Best of addi- 
tional literature. 

60 Onls A Year. Q Months lflp 
Special Offer, fur 1U>" 

If you mention The Black Oat. Address 

EVERY WHERE PUBLISHING CO., Brooklyn, N. V. 




u 



Send ten cents (stamps or silver) and T will 
mail vou.freeof charge, a sample of my new 
Personal EipeMC K«M»k. 

A handy and handsome vest pocket hook, ar- 
ranged to enable you to keep a careful record of 
vimr personal expenses every day in the year 
without trouble to yourself, c.ive these hooks a 
trial, and you will never be without them. 
K. II. BFAfH, I*nl>li»her, 
IO IS11I1I Black, Jtrtrolt, Miehiitan. 



PAYS 



to write for our256-page free book. 

Telia how men with small capital 

can make money with a Magic 

„ Lantern or Stereoptioon. 

Mc\LLISTER. Hfj- Optician, 49 Nassau St., N. \. 



The Readers 
We have— 
We hold ! 



This Is an age of education. No othef nation on the 
{ace of the globe is so intelligent as ours, and 
intelligence makes a nation prosperous and 
happy. Education gives a young man the best 
chance in life. The easiest and cheapest way to 
educate yourself and your children, irrespective of 
the schools and colleges, is by having the best 
current reading in your house. 
THE GREATEST FAMILY NEWSPAPER IS 

Leslie's Illustrated Weekly. 

It tells the story of contemporaneous events and illustrates it with the most 
artistic pictures. He who reads it every week learns to recognize the counte- 
nances of the noblest men and women in public and 
in private life; the appearance of the world's most 
famous places, and the scenes of the greatest historic 
interest. 

LESLIE'S WEEKLY is a paper to keep on the 
library table, and to read and reread, and to file away 
for useful reference. It is read by more families of 
culture and refinement among the masses than any 
other paper of its class in the world. It is the greatest, 
best, most attractive and cheapest of all American 
educators. 

It <s for sale everywhere — on the stands, in the 
bookstores, on all trains, at I O cents per copy. 

LESLIE'S WEEKLY, no Fifth Avenue, New York. 




ADVERTISEMENTS. 



IX 



j^JJ^iiJJiiiiiiiJ ■ 



• 



USEFUL BOOKS FOR 
CHRISTMAS GIFTS.... 

Some books are designed for entertainment, others for informal 
tion. This series combines both features. The information is not 
only complete and reliable, it is compact and readable. These 
are the latest as well as the best books on the subjects of which 
they treat. No one wishing to have a fund of general information, 
or who is inspired with the spirit of selfsimprovement, can afford 
to be without them. They average 200 pages, are 6 x 4'4 inches 
in size, well printed on good paper, handsomely bound in green 
cloth, with a heavy paper wrapper to match. 

Each 50 Cents 




i ETIQUETTE. By Agnes II. Morton. Success in life 
is often marred oy bad manners. A perusal of this 
work will prevent such blunders. It is a Iwok for 
everylKMly, for ilie select sets as well as for the less 
ambitions. The subject is j. resented in a bright and 
interesting manner and represents the latest vogue. 

LETTER WRITING. By Amies II. Morton. Most 
persons dislike Letter wilting because they tear they 
cannot say just the right thing. This admirable book 
not only shows by numerous examples just what 

kind of letters to write for all asions but it 

teaches the reader to become an accomplished, origi- 
nal letter writer. 

QUOTATIONS. Hv Agnes II. Morton. A. -lever com- 
pilation of pithy quotations, selected from a great 
variety of sources, and alphabetically arranged :<■■- 
1 eordingtothesenliinenl. II contains all the popular 
' quotations in current use. together with many rare 
i bits of prose and verse not usually found. 

A DICTIONARY OF MYTHOLOGY. By John II. 

i Bechtel. The average person dislikes to look up 

mythological subjects on account of Hie time occu- 
pied. This book remedies that ditticulty because it 

' contains just what is required for the average person. 

1 It is comprehensive, convenient, condensed and tn- 

» teresting. 

[ SLIPS OF SPEECH, By John II. Hechtel. Who 
does not make them ? The best of us do. Why not 
avoid them? Any one with the desire for self- 
improvement can. No necessity for studying rules 
of rhetoric or grammar, when this hook can be had. 
It teaches both without the study of either. 

! PRACTICAL SYNONYMS. By John II. Reehtel. 

Yny one with the least desire to add to his vocabu- 
lary should have a copy of this book. II is designed 
mainly to meet the wauls of Hie busy merchant or 
lawyer, the thoughtful clergyman or teacher, the 

i wide-awake schoolboy or girl. 

i TOASTS. By William l'ittenger. What would you 
i not give for Hie ability lo respond lo them? No 
need to give much when von can learn the art from 
' this little book. It will tell you how to do n : not 

' only that, hut by example, It Will show you the way. 

I THE DEBATER'S TREASURY. By William Pit- 
I tenger. There is no greater ability than the power 
I of skilful delude. Here are directions for organlz- 
, in" debating societies, and suggestions for all who 
desire to discuss questions in public. Also a list of 
' over 200 questions for debate, with arguments both 
> affirmative and negative. 



CONVERSATION. By J. 1\ Mahaffy. Some people I 

are accused of talking too much. But no one is ever i 

taken lo task for talking too well, nfalillie aecoui- j 
plishments of modern society, that of being an agree- < 
utile CO 1 1 versa! lonallsl holds lirst i. lace. \\ bat to say, 
just bow and when to say it, is the general aim of 
tiiis work. 

PARLOR GAMES. Bv Helen E. Hollister. "What' 
shall we do to amuse ourselves and our friends 1 :" is 
a question frequently propounded. Tins complete ' 
volume most bappily answers this puzzling question. ' 

as it contains a splendid collection of all kinds of i 
games for amusement, entertainment aud instruction. * 

ASTRONOMY: THE SUN AND HIS FAMILY. ' 
By Julia McNair Wright. Can you tell what causes ' 
day and night, seasons and years, tides and eclipses? ' 
Why is the sky blue and .Mars red ? What are mete- i 
ors and shooting stars? These, anda thousand other , 
questions are here answered in a most fascinating ^ 
way. Illustrated. ^ 

BOTANY: THE STORY OF PLANT LIFE. By i 

Julia McNair Wright. The seientillc subject of < 
Botany made as interesting as a fairy tale. Not only , 
is the subject treated with botanical accuracy, but 
there is given much practical information pertain- 
ing to tlie care and treatment of plants and liowers. ' 
Illustrated. I 

FLOWERS: HOW TO GROW THEM. ByEben ' 
E. Kexfoni. Every woman loves flowers, but few ' 
succeed in growlngthem. With the help so clearly I 
given in tiiis volume, no one need fail. It treats , 
ntainlv of indoor plants and tlowers. those for win- , 
dow gardening, all about their selection, care, light, , 
air, warmth, etc 

DANCING. Bv Marguerite Wilson. A complete in- i 
struetor beginning with the first positions and lead- , 
tog up to the square and round dances. A full list of ^ 
calls for square dances, tin- etiquette of the dances, 
and loo figures for the gernian. Illustrated. 

PRACTICAL PALMISTRY. By Henry Frith, i 
Palmistry is one of the most popular subjects of the , 
day. More people would be interested in it it they 
properly understood it. This volume tm-nishes lull 
and trustworthy information on the subject, anil by 
means of it, anv one will he able to read character 
fully and accurately. Illustrated. 

LAW. AND HOW TO KEEP OUT OF IT. By 

I'ascliall II. Oogglns, Esq. Most legal difficulties 
arise from ignorance of the minor points ot law. 
This book furnishes to the busy man and woman In- 
formation on just such points as are likely to arise m 
even-day affairs, and thus forestalls them against 
mental worry aud financial loss. 



1 Our 80 page catalogue it enclosed with every order, or it can be had for the askinff 

The books mentioned are for sale at alt bookstores or trill be mailed for the price 

;THE PENN PUBLISHING COMPANY 923 Arch Street Philadelphia 
ee€ «seeee«e«*sss««sss£se«s Assess «essss€«es«****s« 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



3 

5 



-9 

-9 



>•» Jf your bookseller or newsdealer won't ft- 

^ supply you we will send a copy postpaid ft- 

^J upon receipt of price. ft. 

>» ,v The American News Company, Publishers' ft^ 

' j&m^. Agents, 30-41 Chambers St., New York. fc. 

St 




o/ tfte 



ifey/ Stories 

EverToH 



St 




Including the great $1500 prize 

story, "The Tax on Moustaches;" 

$1000 prize story, " The Qlen 

Echo Mystery;" $500 prize story, 
£ " The Heart of Qod;" " The Mys- 
■^ terlous Card," etc., etc. 

■2g 8mo. 320 pages, laid paper, clear 
^g type, unique paper-canvas cover. 

Ji Price, 50 cents. 

■9 

>m 

-9 

* 
jf|f If Jf If If If If If If If If If If If If If If If If If If**** 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



XI 



Fifty Pen Pictures of Home Life 



As Revealed to 



THE PASTOR 
THE TEACHER 



THE PHYSICIAN 
THE LAWYER 



Will be Given to the Readers of The 
Household during the Year 1900. 

NO PROFESSIONS touch more closely the 
Home and the Business Life, carry more se- 
crets, and exert greater influences, than those 
of the Pastor, the Physician, the Teacher and 



the Lawyer. 

Subscribe 
to 



The Household 



$1 

PER 
YEAR 



EACH issue contains: 



The Best Stories of Home Life. 
Short Articles on Current Events. 
Interesting Facts and Amusing Incidents. 
Seasonable Suggestions on What to Wear. 
Incidents and Illustrations for Children. 
New Patterns for Knitting and Crocheting. 
Lessons from the Boston Cooking School. 
Window Gardening and Flower Culture. 
Practical Receipts for Home Cooking. 
Battenberg Lace in New Stitches. 
How to Decorate the Home. 
Practical Suggestions for Mothers. 
Lessons in Silk Embroidery. 
Popular Home Entertainment. 
Etiquette in Social Life. 
AddressThe Household, no Boylston St., Boston, Mass_ 



TheWhiteBrick 

SI000 Prize Story 

By Frank E. Chase 



Will appear Complete 
in 

The Black Cat 

for 

January 1900 



For Your Convenience 

that excellent dentifrice 
and detergent mouth wash 




NEW SIZE 
PRICE 25c. 



This is the Sozodont Liquid. 
The Sozodont Powder is also 25c. 
Sozodont complete, Large Size Liq- 
uid and the Powder in a box, 75c. 
At the stores or by mail, postage 
prepaid, for the price. Address 
P.O. Box 247, New York City.. 



New York. 



, HALL ft RUCKEL. 

Proprietor*. 



Send a Dollar for this 

INGERSOLL $ WATCH 

and GUARANTEE. 



MAK£RS.i6J-l£5WASHlNGTON$I\ 
EWYORKC.TUGflEETHATIF\ 
WITHOUTMiSUSfTHISWATCHfAltS 
DMP GOOD TIME fURONE YE*fi,TH£rl 
WIU.IJPrjN ITS RETURNTOum 
J0C£THER WfTH 5*fDR RfHAPUKC> 

"ndthisagrkmentr™ 

■ JTfBEE Of CHARGE. 

Now known the world 
over, the Wonder of 
all Watches, foi 
Jlerit, Beauty ami 
Price, Cm shows it 
exactly— also i i s 
Marvelous Guaran- 
tee, ill-* B roa 'i est 
ever given with <•<"> 
Watch : ami there is 

12.000,000 Lark of it. 
Every live Merchant, 
Postmaster, Express 

Ayent or Hank knows 
ns by Reputation or Ex- 
perience. 
Semi a dollar bill and get 
the latest 'Hit Model ; money 
back if wanted. 

ROBT. H. INGERSOLL &. BRO., Makers 

[)ept. 156, 67Cortlandt St.. New York City 




Xll 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



iSPECIA.T'i: IGH-^RADB MESTIC, ECCLESIASTICAL, MONUMENTAL AND MUNICIPAL ARCHITECTURE. 




ARTISTIC HOMES 



A 304 -Page Boot 

of Low-cost Houses 95c 
( The Cottage Builder" Issued monthly. $1.0O Yearly, 

WITII ANY TWO OF THE FOLLOWING LIST OF NEW BOOKS. 

32 Moderate cost Houses25c t 32 Summer Cottages 25c | 32 Houses $1200 to $13)0 25c 
88 Frame Cottages No. 1, 25c S3 Artistic Churches 25c 32 Houses $1500 to $21100 25c 
32 Frame Cottages No. 3, 25c 32 Double Residenees25c J 32 HouseB $1800 to $i!5n025c 
32 Frame Cottages No. 4, 25c 1 32 Bnck City Houses25c I 32 Houses $1000 to $1200 25c 

3SG Wninwright Untitling 
St. LouU, >ln. 



HERBERT C. CHiVERS, Architect, 



GiLb £B hM 



V CUSHION 



S70KN '*S I o«- -[HE SHOE 



Easy Walking, 
Increase-) Heig'it, 
Arched Instep, 
Better Fitting Shoes, 
Ease and Comfort. 

Simply placed in the heel, felt down. Donotreqi.ir -arger 
shoes. Invisible, durable, healthful, recommended ! ypl •*& 
cians. Ruined <>r lowered by adding or removing .aye - I 
cork. 1-2 in. 25c. : 3-4 in. 35c. ;1 in. 50c. per pair.Ladi- -'<-7Men'« 
DC All Send name, Bize of shoe, height desired, and 2c. 
n CH U stamp for pair on 10 days' trial. 

GILBERT MFG. CO, 50 m 3! , o hester, N. Y. 




NEW IDEA 

IN TRUNKS 

The si:iiiiii:iri llreNRer 
Tru n kisaportable dressing 
case, with drawers instead of 
trays; the bottom is as acces- 
sible as the top. Costs no 
more than a good box trunk. 
Shipped C. O. 1). with privi- 
lege to examine. Send lor 
illustrated catalogue. 

88 W. Spring St., Culutubns, O. 




The Leonard Sofa Bed. 

A uxnrtcus Sofa, couch length, instantly convertible into - 
a large, soft hair-mattress bed, with receptacle for bedding. . 
10 styles. Freight prepaid, catalogues free. Retainable if ] 
not satisfactory. Prices, in best Pantasote, $33.00 to $65.00. i 
Will utwear leather. Patented, manufactured and sold ( 
only by 

The Leonard Sofa Bed Co., 410 Erie St., Cleveland, 0. 




GRACEFUL 
CURVES AND 
EASY GRADES 



give comfort to a journey via the New 
York Central Lines between Chicago, St. 
Louis and Cincinnati, and New York and 
Boston. No other line approaches the 
New York Central in the number, charac- 
ter and speed of its trains. 



For a copy of "The Luxury of Modern Railway 
Travel," send a i-cent stamp to George H. Daniels, 
General Passenger Agent, Grand Central Station, 
New York. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



Xlll 




California Limited 



Finest Train 
West of Chicago 



66 Hours to Los Angeles 

Pullmans, Dining Car, 
Buffet-Smoking Car (with Barber Shop), 
Observation Car (with Ladies' Parlor), 
Vestibuled and electric-lighted throughout. 



Four Times a Week 

Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, 8:00 p.m., from Chicago, 
beginning November 7. 



General Passenger Office, 

The Atchison. Topeka & Santa 

CHICAGO. 



f. R.iiw.y Santa Fe Route 



XIV 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Comptometer. 

Adding, Multiplying and Dividing Machine, for Account- 
ants and Engineers. 

The Northwestern Life Association of Minneapolis, Minneapolis, 
Minn ., writes . "It has proven itself to be invaluable and the heretofore 
much to-be-dreaded trial balances are now, with the help of the Compto- 
meter, a mere pastime.'* 

Walworth Manufacturing Company, Boston, writes: "We have 
found it entirely satisfactory in every way, it never having been out of 
repair We should not wish to dispense with it on any account." 

R. H.Thompson. Walloomsac Paper Co., Troy, N. Y., writes- "It is 
only a matter of time before it will be as indispensable in all branches of 
business as the typewriter " 

Felt & Tarrant Mfg. Co., 

Write for Pamphlet. 52 to 56 Illinois Street, CHIC AGO, ILL., U.S.A. 





4"iyi81BU£ WRITING -W^l 

OliveR 

TYPEWRITER 

is the first and only 
writing machine having 
a type bar that secures 

PERMANENT 
ALIGNMENT 

It is made of steel. 

The "U" shape of the 
type bar with its two ends fasten- 
ed to large tool steel axle, pre- 
vents its getting out of alignment 
and doubles the strength and 
durability of the type bar. 

See cut to left. 

write for Catalogue " P " and get name ql near- 
est representative. Agents in all leading cities. 

THE OLIVER TYPEWRITER CO.. 

Dearborn and Washington Sis., - CHICAGO. 

LATEST 

Music Teacher 

Very Suitable for Holiday Gifts 

Is the "Latest system to Learn to play on the piano 
or organ." ii is simple, can be understood bj 
everyone, and has the highest Indoreemenl of on? 
home teacher*. One whole term will be sent to 
any address on receipt of two dollars, postpaid, 
or C i> Rend money i»\ registered letter, 
postal or express money order. 



INCREASE YOUR SALARY! 

Send 15 Cents for 3 Months' Trial 
Subscription to 

"The Bookkeeper" 




E. H. BEACH, Editor. 

A handsome monthly magazine for 
book-keepers, cashiers and business 
men. It will teach you book=keeping, 
shorthand, penmanship, law, short 
cuts, corporation accounting, banking, 
business pointers, amusing arithmetic, 
lightning calculations, etc. 
fl.OO A YEAR. 

The Book-Keeper Co. Ltd. 

162 Buhl Block, Detroit, Mich. 



M im , ,,. mm ». M , ,. m i 



WIS 



S F LINTNER. Racinc. . 



HALF-TONE AND LINE 

E NGRAVIN G 

Color Printing a Specialty. 
Samples and Estimates cheer- 
fully furnished. 

THE BOSTON ENGRAVING CO 

Illustrators and Engravers. 

50 Hartford and 113 Purchase Sts.. BOSTON, MASS. 



A Monthly Magazine of Original Short Stories. 



No. 51. DECEMBER, 1899. 



I'm: iil.irii. CAT is .1,'vin.n.l uxelmirHlv l.i. .irijjl mil . unusual, fasci listing itorkil — I'Viiry 
number i? jomiilaL..- 111 iu-eil. Ii. [..ulili»hi!!i un -■-[ ml*, trmsJHiJ », tirinviumiR*, r>r Hurtling*. 

It piiVi llULhlLlj! [■■■■ Ii |V|, I, |. ,1 I. ., ■.,,,[,■[■. I, ,,l I,- LM,.L,'^L Jill W...M |..l>7.. 

:,-..' . ... .,'.' ,,V.'i- iruis t"l>.- "sent nnwltod, fully prepaid, and Rccomp*liled by ml.'lr.'.!,-'i 



s Oat fu-t- jiMtei tnl >•» ■■.•/■i,r.ti),!,.iitil jmbtisk. 
,i.ii:, w ih r tforiet, aUKer uiotiy win par!. 



A Postal Card Tragedy.* 



BY E. F. lil.Slinp, 




jflO doubt Sir Rowland Hill foresaw much of the 
enormous Increase of correspondence which his 
great penny postage refonii was sine to cause, 
and he survived to witness ,i great part of it in 
his own country, and indeed even lived to see 
the post card, and to know of the introduction 
of its American cousin, the postal card, into the United States. 

But even his sanguine mind could mil have conceived of the 
extravagant fashion in which the "postals" were welcomed by 
Americans, to whom they doubly recommended themselves l>, 
their convenience and novelty. In the early seventies thousands 
were bought and sent by everybody to anybody — about any- 
thing. It was iin amusement so I'iiscinul iiie- unl inexpensive that, 
the young fairly revelled in it. 

George Reade was a member of a junior olass in a well-known 
boys' school in which the "craze" hail an extensive run. Tie 
boys bought them by the pack and showered them upon relatives, 
friends and acquaintances, and finally upon entire strangers. The 
newspapers told of one ingenious w liter who succeeded in having 

■ Copyright, 18W, by The Shortntory PubliibiPK Company. All right" reiervtd. 



2 a Postal card tragedy. 

a card rani round the world and returned to Mm — a performance 
winch the postal regulations now forbid-— and young Reade's 
schoolmates emulated lln' achievement, but without success. 
Then they began to write absurd messages to creatures of their 
imagination. Nu replies were expected or received, but the boys 
delighted in showing Bach other these foolish productions and 
chuckling over imaginary ;i. >yauees of rural postmasters in re- 
mote regions in endeavoring to find claimants for " postals '* that 
never would he called for. 

The specialty which George Reads had determined to master 
was mineralogy, with a, view to ultimate mining, and of course, 
an eventual fortune, The waste places on the maps in bis atlas — 
l hose marked " unknown ''and •■ unexplored " — had for him an es- 
pecial attraeticn, anil any large district in the great West where 
few towns were marked his fancy readily filled with auriferous 
ledges, mother-lodes and El Dorado pockets. Maps of northwest- 
ern States he found particularly interesting, so much of them was 
blank in those days, save Ear a few devious streams and a host of 
little lakes, mostly unnamed. In the northern half of one State 
there was scarcely a post-office indicated. This was before Reade 
had heard of "star routes," but he had just familiarized himself 
with the postal card, and felt that here would be a grand way to 
stimulate the postal sen tee and call the attention of the authori- 
ties to the needs of a slighted section, for he was convinced that 
there must he some inhabitants in sin-li a great stretch of country. 

Accordingly, he determined to bring to the attention of the 
Post-office Department the lack of facilities in this neglected re- 
gion. Directly in the centre of the emptiest portion of the map 
he found a lung, narrow, winding lake, named •■ Vermilion." No 
settlement appeared anywhere wit Inn scores of miles, but nf course 
there ought to be a settlement — -with a post-office- — in such an 
eligible site, and naturally it should take its name from the lake. 
So Reade sat down and carefully addressed a postal as follows: 



JiiHS W, WATSON, 
VbkmiliOs Lake, 

Bhi Eiinw Corarr, 

Minnesota, U. S. A. 



A POSTAL QARD I'CAfiEDV. H 

Why lie wrote Watson at all much less John W. — he did not 

know tlitii and ilous not know now. He never knew personally a 

Watson, ami never has, to this day. But telepathy (dates 

(PireleBB telegraphy, However, Reade was seeking for no expla- 
nation, occult or otherwise), of this choice of a. name, but was in- 
tent only at the time on the composition of his missive to the un- 
known Watson, which finally took this form : 

Tilto* Hall, Alhuny, N. Y., June 6, 1871, 
My Oesr Watson: 
Don't [ortfet your promise to find a b°o<1 vein (or me. I ahull t each your plBM in UH 

Your true friend. BRORGB A. READE. 

Young Reade's mind was full of mines and mining, and, know- 
ing nothing to the contrary, he assumed all the rocks in the reginn 
selected to be metalliferous. So he gloated over the puzzle which 
be supposed tins absurd card would afford to numerous postal 
clerks and postmaster, not imagining that they would read noth- 
ing but the addressed side. He was educated, of course, above 
the grade of those who address acquaintance and stranger alike as 
" friend," and he could not have told why he employed that form, 
unless it were an unconscious assumption of the inferior social 
rank of his mythical correspondent. However, Reade dropped hi-' 
card, the last of the kind lie ever wrote, in the nearest mail box, 
and soon forgot all about it. 

fn 1877 he had completed his course in this preparatory school 
and entered a scientific institution, from which he waa graduated 
in due course as a mining engineer. The first position he ob- 
tained was not a particularly promising one, lint he was soon sent 
West on a fair salary, and now fully embarked on a oareei in 
which practice speedily displaced theory, lie was here, there and 
everywhere among Western mining camps. 

In June, 1884, George Reade arrived in Denver, and found 
I here awaiting him a quantity of mail matter, including a letter 
from his mother, enclosing a postal card addressed to linn at 
Albany, forwarded by the principal of his old preparatory school. 
It; read : 



4 A POSTAL CARD TRAGEDY. 

Reade was mystified. He mid the card twice, looked at the 
address again, saw that it surely was directed to him, and finally 

iIuvm h. into the waste l>asket, being nimble to decide whether it 
was simply a mistake or a joke. 

Two or three weeks later his mother enclosed him a second bos- 
tal card in the same band as tlie (list. It said : 



your friend JOHN 

"Well," thought Reade, "this is odd." In vain lie cudgelled 
his memory. He knew no one of the name of Watson, had no 
familiar •' friend " John, and bad made no agreement to go any- 
where, with anybody. So he threw his second card away. 

Ten days later came a third card, enclosed iu an enquiry from 
Keade's mother as to what it all meant. The third card ran as 
follows : 



This was too much for Reade. The distress of the writer 
seemed so genuine that lie couldn't help feeling sorry for him, and 
yet In: disliked very much being troubled with the lamentations of 
this unknown Jeremiah. " Where is Vermilion Lake, anyhow?" 
he wondered, as with cross words he tore up the puzzling commu- 
nication. 

By this time midsummer bad arrived, and George went East on 
a vacation, well pleased with his Western successes, and eager to 
talk again with family and friends. Among the latter were two 
or three schoolmates, and they recalled old times with almost boy- 
ish interest. As he lit his pipe one evening one of them suddenly 
exclaimed : 

" Do yon remember our postal card craze '! I believe I wrote 
cards to Bismarck and the King of Siam. What a funny freak 
it was ! " 

" ^ es," replied George, " it seemed so ridiculously cheap in 
those days to send the equivalent of a letter — stamp, stationery 
and all — for a single cent. Hut I remember I always wrote my 
bogus epistles in the innocent supposition that they would be 
eagerly read by every postal employee who handled them. What 
kids we were I " 



A POSTAL (JAKD TRAGEDY. 5 

But when his friends bad gone Reade's mind continued to 
dwell on this particular phase of boyhood's freaks, and in think- 
ing of postal cards he could not dismiss from recollection his 
mysterious cm-respondent, Watson, and the desire to know the 
location of Vermilion Lake grew upon him. Taking down a 
Gazetteer, he found that there were a number of Vermilion Lakes 
but that he had never been near any of them. Obviously, he 
thought, ho was not the Reade wanted by somebody somewhere, 
and so he shut the book and went to bed. 

The next morning one of George's sisters brought in the mail. 
It contained still another card from " Watson," directed this time 
to his home and not, as the previous ones had been, to the school. 
The writer said : 



■IhtlL- YHH 


didiit gc 


t n 


.y othBr 


letters I a 


ib all thi 






y writii 






ight. 








- friend 




J 


W WATSON 



Ruade's puzzle was renewed. He could make nothing of it. 
He had seen from the first that his correspondent was uneducated, 
but now when he studied the shaky writing it occurred to him 
that its sinuosities might be the re s id t of the tremor of age. He 
regretted that lie had not answered one of the previous cards, 
addressing it at random to Vermilion Lake, as a line would suffice 
to inform Watson that Ins communications were going to the 
wrong Reade. He resolved to write that very day, hut forgot it 
altogether in some diversions planned by his sisters, and the mat- 
ter did not surmount the threshold of consciousness again till he 
had returned to the West and the mail from home brought him a 
reminder in this shape : 



Here was a practical hint which Reade now lost no time in fol- 
lowing up. He wrote at once to Vermilion Lake, Minnesota — 
not on a postal card ■ — informing Watson that he had received a 
number of cards from him evidently intended for some other 
Reade, and regretting that he had not been able to notify him 
sooner. This salved his conscience, and he supposed he had 



b A POSTAL CARD TRAGEDY. 

heard the last of his unknown correspondent. But not long after- 
ward he received the following; 



This wee really astounding, and Reade could not get the matter 
out of liiw head, day or night. Who could this mysterious Wat- 
son be, and why w;is he afflicted with his disappointments? Pro- 
curing a Postal Guide, George found that there actually was a 
Vermilion Lake, Minnesota, and going to a map he looked up its 
exact location. While doing so his mind half-consciously revested 
to his recent conversation with his schoolmates and traveled hack 
to the days they had recalled, and in a flash, the resurrection of a 
long dormant memory, came a recollection of that last boyish 
postal sard, written to some imaginary person ten years before. 
and In' realized that he was the right George A. Reade, to whom 
all those puzzling cards had been written! What an absurd, 
thoughtless prank it had been, and now it had resulted in causing 
trouble, and apparently actual suffering, to a fellow-being of 
whose very existence he had been ignorant when lie first wrote. 

hull of contrition, he now wrote, explaining at length the 
(jirCTiniBtances under which the first card was written by a mere 
boy, expressing deep regret, and enquiring what he could do to 
make amends and especially why Watson seemed bo eager to Bee 
him. 

lie was now deeply interested, and awaited with impatience a 
reply. Prom Watson's previous importunity he had expected 
promptness in tins instance, but instead there was a long interval 
of silence. Then there came a rather official-looking document, 
bearing vnv distinctly the Vermilion Lake post-office stamp. It 
proved to he from the postmaster himself, and stated that John 
W. Watson had died there, after an illness of several weeks, leav- 
ing all his property to George A. Reade, hut that all his visible 
effects consisted of an old rifle, a canoe and some papers whose 
contents were unknown. Enough had been realized from the sale 
of these Eew assets lo defray funeral expenses, with the exception 
of ■>. balance of J4.50, Would Mr. Reade please remit that 



A I'OSTAJ. CAKD TKAGEDY. I 

amount '■ Watson, the writer stated, had always spoken of 
Reade as the only friend he had in the world, and was always 
expecting a visit from him. The postmaster added that lie feared 
tin- old man had really starved to death, having all summer, 
though tun old In hunt, or fish much, refused several offers "I 
assistance, saying thai bis friend Reade was coming soon and 
would >ee him through. 

George Readfl dropped his wink, and took the first tram to a 
point where he could catch a stage for Vermilion Lake. Forty 
mile of rough riding took him to a collection of twenty or thirty 
tog shanties, where tlie storekeeper's sign directed him to the post- 
office. A short, stout, man came forward when that official was 
asked for. and to him Reade told his errand, and asked about 
Watson. 

" We-ld," said he, " John was a peeooliar BOM, Never knowcd 
him, YOU say? Ha was mortal fond of you — never shipped talk- 
in' 'bout you these last ten years, ffe had 'a camp up the lake 
here, 'hout nine miles, and would mostly paddle down Saturday 
nights and set here lalkiu' 'bout you. Couldn't talk "hout imi Inn' 
else, I guess. Said yon was the only friend he ever had. He'd 
no family — said they was all dead — ;md that no man ever called 
him a friend bat you. Lhal is, uutside of some of us fellers, but 
guess we didn't, count. He wanted to see you pretty had ever 
aenoe last May — used to expect you every week, almost. Finally, 
'hunt lasi June, lie came down here and stayed till hr died. Said 
you was due every day. and used to Write you pustal cards. Said 
they was the best thing this government ever did — showed they 
thought of the poor man sometimes. 

" Wed-1. toward tlie la.sl he slept here, when lie didn't Bleep nut. 
and he got, lower find lower. Made me swear I would keep some 
papers he had and give 'em to you when you did come. Here 
they are. He had a hard time writiiv "em. He got pretty ilnn. 
and petered out after that. I sold his outfit, but kept tlieui 
papers. No good, I suppose ? Some of the boys thought he was 
sort o) off in Ins head, but he wasn't — just queer. Yes, thank 
you, $4.60, that's right, tie said you'd make up anytbin' short 
yVasn'1 any relation, you say ? " 

" No," answered Reade. "just a friend." 



8 A POSTAL OABD THAGEDV. 

The "papers" consisted of a few sheets of white wrapping 
paper, such an storekeepers use, laboriously covered with pencil 
writing, in a large, cramped hand. The one of greatest immediate 
interesl to Reade was as follows: 

near george 

had I kept yurc card and united & mebbo I waited to long the Iron Is there & you can 
find It all right by following up back ot my place to the big pine with the X blaze then 
go K E about 100 rod to a big rock covered with moss you oast mJw it. then go Eaat SO 

it Hint fur off about 50 tat you wil fi.id it dare Put in a blast or too I was on my lust 
legs I knew the etuH was there but I bod no money and grub is high all my Fainly la did 
it ia all yourn yon was the only friend I hud on ertb that Is eiept the boys who said i 
fU nraiy Why dldnt you come in the spring i rote you sin times I hope you aint Bick 
as i am and the grub givi- out Your frend 

-T W WATSON 

Beneath this farewell letter were papers fully establishing 
Wat-sou's homestead and mineral claims, and last nf all was the 
portal card which Kra.de had written him when a boy. His eyes 
Wtaa moist ami his Lip trembled when he laid aside the packet. 

Have you seen (lie Watson Hospital, on a high, breezy blurt', 
iiverlniikiiig the rluucing waters of Lake Superior? Yes, it cost a 
large sum. George A. Beade paid the hills, but he says he did it 
with John W. Watson's money. Perhaps you also noticed the 
Old Mines' Home, near by? That was paid for, too, with 
Watson's money, or, at least, with the proceeds of the iron ore 
In- I'limd and guarded so faithfully. Keade declares he only 
worked the vein when it was too late to do Watson any good. 

Reade's eldest boy is named Watson — John Watson Reade. 
They call bins Watson for short. But George A. Reade will not 
tolerate a postal card, in his home, at his office, or about his busi- 
ness iu any way. and it gives him it heartache when lie sees one. 





The Gratitude of Mrs. Hatch.* 

[IV H. II. DUNHAM, 

^^feDV' :N MOKUISON ' tlie MgHuffepof the sheriffs 

■ : """ ; ' X3' "ti'"'*'' wit.li his understudy, the junior deputy, 
is sent out into the country, a matter of fifty 
S)| miles or so, to make an arrest on an indictment 
fur rustling cattle. He brought in his man 
alive, but unconscious, pretty well bruised, and 
with a dent in bis occiput about the size ami shape of the butt of 
the deputy's revolver. 

Now, the sheriff's office had been down on its luck all summer, 
and It was of a piece with the rest that the Grand Jury, just then 
in annual session, instead of commending the success of Morrison, 
should listen instead to the prosecuting attorney and to a witness 
whom he hurried in from the back country, and Inula, true bill 
against Benjamin Morrison and William Judd, "that they did, 
upon the said 25th day of August, assault with intent to kill one 
.lob Hutch, contrary to the law in such cases made and provided, 
and against the peace and dignity of the Commonwealth aforesaid," 
Tlic si ilc remaining deputy turned the kej upon hia associates, and 
for a time the sheriff's office was wofully short-handed, for the 
chief said, " If the public rather pay my men for keeping tin' jail 
full in that way, it's all the same to inc. ami less trouble, but I'll 
not appoint another man." 

The incarcerated deputies were indignant., hut not alarmed. 
They had, on their retom, given a straightforward account of the 
circumstances attending the injury to Hatch, which statement 
they repeated without, deviation at the trial. The sheriff said the 
thing was a dirty political trick of the county attorney. The 
attorney said lie was sure of securing a conviction, and the prose- 
cuting witness, pending the trial, said nothing. There wen.' no 
dilatory motions from either side — in fact both urged a speedy 

- Copyright, 1BB9. by The Shortatory r-ubl lulling Company. All rights reserved. 



10 



1111- &RATITUDE OF Mils. HATCH. 



trial — and the case came u f . within ten days after the indictment 
During this interval the condition of the unfortunate man at the 
hospital was unchanged. He lay irnnonsoions and without speech. 
His wife novel lel'L him hut when she went l.efore the jury, and 
»ei name appeared upon the indictment as prosecuting witness. 

Morrison and Judd scarcely recognized the gravity of their 
situation until they were brought into court upon the day of trial. 
1,1:11 '' " :ls '" '"' no perfunctory prosecution was evidenced by 
the attendance (J' an eminent attorney, "imported," as tie defence 
phrased it. "to hamstring the jury.' 1 

The jury being finally secured by the usual practice of care- 
fully excluding every 1] who kne* anything about the case, 1 

tu "" d '".»«'"' > "'' Bw twelve ,t,™ duly sworn to hear the 

" ,n1, I '"•'■ judgment give between the people and the 

pnsonera at bar. Then the visiting lawyer with the keen eye 

and the soft voice, whose habit it was to work jurors as the potter 
works liis clay, gave us his opening statement. 
"Gentlemen," he said. ■■! should not be in this ease at all but 

toi ■ woman's tears, A great wrong has l, fone. v „ camiot 

right it — no one can. What yon can do, and what wo expect 
you to do, is to punish the wrong-doers. We shall prove to you 

Had. the officers went to the house of this | i man. sought a 

quarrel with him, beat him unmercifully aial brought him down 
here to die. We shall prove this by his wife, who saw it, whose 
presence did not deter these ruffians, whose tears at length pre- 
vailed on me to prosecute tin's suit." 

Replying to this opening, the defence said to the jury: ■■ hi a 
neighboring city a big brick block, some twelve stories high, bears 
the inline -.1' llm opposing counsel. h was not built with woman's 
tears. The twenty farms he owns were never lMiugkt with tears. 
He works for cash only, and in advance, and in this instance the 
'i I' Domes from the coffers of a political committee. Wc shall 
show that the unfortunate man was hurt by an accident resulting 
from his nun bud temper, and to which the defendants were not in 
any maimer contributory." 

After the evidence of the attending surgeon, wiio declined to 
swear Ibat the blew was or was not struck with a revolver, Mrs. 
Hatch was put on tire stand. Her story was this : Only one man 



lo-IK la'-ATlTTTlil-: ill- 1 Mils, llAC'li 11 

cam, to her house— Mormon, He found Hatoh M home, and, 
without slowing hi» papers or stating hie bosiness, interfered .1 



the ranchman's treatment o! a vicious cow. 



Hatch was unarmed 



..,,,1 no physical match for Morrison. Alter some altercation he 
ran toward" the house ; Morrison overtook him ami foiled him with 
,1 blow 0,1 the back of the bead, 

IJpon cross-examination Mrs. Hatch coniradicted herself in some 
minor matters and broke down. Hut she was solid as a rock .,11 
the main (act — that her husband was struck down by the cilice. 
Throughout her testimony Morrison gave the closest attention, 
and, if I could read the expression on his lace, it was one of doobl 
and surprise. He looked not like a man hearing the faillilcl 
account of his own misdeed, but as if ho were hearing a shocking 
Story for the first time. I made a mental note in Morrison's favor, 
but later, when he himself testified. I rubied il out and went over 
to the woman's side. 

The court will always caution jurors against coming 1 

elusion before the evidence is in. But in lliis ease 1 earns to 
several, all of them erroneous, in 1]| c course of the trial. 

The testimony of Morrison and .1,1,1,1 Mas :,s diifercui as possible 
from that of Mrs. Hatch. Acceding i„ their statement, which 
the ingenuity of opposing counsel tried in vain 1" break or shake, 
they had not readied Hatch's house when they met him in the 
road. In a country where every man knows and values a good 

home they had at once noticed the line mount „t Hatch, I had 

engaged him in a conversation which ultimated in a horse race, 
with twenty dollars up, between March and .held. 

"I'll give you n good beating," shouted Hatch, as Morrison 
started them down a strip of level highway. But his linc-lccking 
horse was just a bit too fat to go up against .ludd's wiry bronco, 
and he was beaten by a short length. Seeing which, Hatch bit his 
horse upon the head with the quirt, causing him to rear and (all 
iipnii his rider. 

That was the wlole story the men had to tell — succinct, com- 
plete, but not convincing. Over and over. On cross-examination 
it was repeated by both men like a well learned lesson. Looking 
and listening! make up icy 1111. id that this evidence was false; 
ergo, the woman's was true. 



IS THE GRATITUDE OE MBS. HATCH. 

After the arguments of annuel and the verbal fireworks of the 
imported lawyer, who never made arguments, but always and 
everywhere stump-speeches, the learned judge charged us at great 
length to iind the defendants guilty if they were guilty, and not 
guilty it they were innocent, and we were locked up. 

In the jury room Judd, of course, was acquitted on the first bal- 
lot. The feeling was strong, but not unanimous, against Morrison. 
Me fiad a friend or two who were stout in his defence. They 
urged that Morrison might kill a man on occasion — had done so 
perhaps — but never from behind. 

There was much argument and no agreement until, late in the 
evening, contrary to every rule of law and in contempt of court, 
some new evidence was submitted to the jury. It came in the 
form of a note to me from my friend the doctor, shoved under the 
door of the jury room behind the bailiff's back. It read as follows : 



Geobqe:-, 


A noon to 


day Dr. Marnton aud myself operated on Jol 






red that the man wnuld stand it, but as be co 


""'"'' "'"'"" 




'It tbat chance, and lost. He died witliln 



11 give yon a good b 



Those were exactly the words testified as used by Hatch at the 
alleged horse-race, and the note, thrown into the scale of conflict- 
ing opinion in the jury, turned the balance in favor of Morrison, 
and he also was acquitted, 

In another pai t of the West, years later, I made a long wagon 
journey with Morrison. I came to know his brave nature well, 
and proved his worth on many occasion,. One night, under the' 
summer stare, when the camp-fires burned low, I said to him with- 
out prelude, 

" Ben, who killed Job Hatch ? " 

After a silence, " His wife." 

" Are you sure?" 

" I saw it. I went out there to arrest him and he was beating 
bis wife. As I rode up she grabbed the gun from his holster and 
hit him. It was a chance blow, but the woman was frenzied and 
it felled him like an ox. He got about what he deserved and I 



THE GRATITUDE OF MRS. HATCH. IS 

told the woman that I'd see her through, Of course, any jury 
would have cleared her on the facts, but she had been a girl well 
connected and said she'd rather die than have her people know. 
So I did what I did." 

"But," I cried, "what was the occasion for her bad faith? 
Why did she try to fasten the deed on you?" 

After another pause and the lighting of another pipe Ben 
replied slowly: "I don't know. I have tried to follow a good 
many trails into a woman's mind, but they are always blind trails, 
They lead nowhere. My guess is that she tried to do me up 
because I went there to arrest her husband for a thief. No sooner 
was he gone than she began to idealize him, and she was as fierce 
against me in his defence as she bad been against him in her own. 
That's my guess, but all I absolutely know is that she seemed very 
grateful to me for my promise to shield her. And two days after 
I got the worst jolt of my life when I was locked up to a 



"You must have known before the trial came on," said I, 
" what the woman meant to testify. Why not then have given 
the court the facts? Why did you stand by her in spite of her- 
self?" 

No answer. 

I wanted to get from him an avowal that he thought he had 
done a brave and generous thing. 

" Supposing ynu had hoen convicted mi her testimony?" I per- 
sisted. 

But Morrison only said quietly, "Thea you would be making 
this journey alone." 




Ely's Automatic Housemaid.* 




BV ELIZABETH W. BELLAMY. 

|N order for a man to have faith ill such an inven- 
tion, he would have to know Harrison Ely. 
For Harrison Ely was a genius. I had known 
him in college, a man amazingly dull in Latin 

;i: " 1 '•"■ek I even in English, but with ideas 

v * 01 bis own that could not be expressed in 
language. His bent was purely mechanical, and found expression 
in innumerable ingenious contrivances to facilitate the slu.lv 10 
which he had no inclination. His self-acting lexicon-holder was a 
matte! of admiring wonder to his classmates, but it did not serve 
. to increase the tenacity of his mental grasp upon the contents of 
the volume, and so did little to recommend him to the faculty. 
And his self-feeding safety student-lamp admirably illuminated 
everything for him save the true and only path to an honorable 
degree. 

It had been years since I had seen him or thought of him, but 
the memory is tenacious of small things, and the big yellow enve- 
lope which I found one morning awaiting me upon my breakfast- 
table brought his eccentric personality hack to' me witli a rush. 
It was addressed to me in the Archimedean script always so 
characteristic of him, combining, as it seemed to do, the principles 
of Hie screw and of the inclined plane, and in its superscription 
Harrison Ely stood unmistakably revealed. 

It was the first morning of a new cook, the latest potentate of 
a dynasty of ten who had briefly ruled in turn over our kitchen 
and ourselves during the preceding three months, and succes- 
sively abdicated in favor of one another under the compelling in- 
fluences of popular clamor, and in the face of such a political crisis 
my classmate's letter faded to receive immediate attention. Un- 
fortunately but not unexpectedly the latest occupant of our 

• C»p„l,l,l, ,«,, b, Th, Sh.rUU.,, P.bll.Mn, «.,„,. A„ „,»,. ,.„„, d . 



ELT*8 AUTOMATIC HOUBEMAtD. 15 

culinary throne began her reign with no conspicuous reforms, and 
we received in gloomy silence her preliminary enactments in the 
way of greasy omelette and turbid and flavorless coffee, the yellow 
Bcreed of Harrison Ely looking on the while with bilious sympathy 
as it leaned unopened against the water-bottle beside me. 

As 1 drained the last medicinal drop of coffee my eye fell upon 
it, and needing a vicarious outlet for my feelings toward the cook, 
I seized it and tore it viciously open. It contained a letter from 
my classmate and half a dozen printed circulars. I spread open 
the former, and my eye fastened at once upon this sympathetic 
exordium : 

"Doubtless, my dear friend, you have known what discomfort 
it is to be at the mercy of incompetent domestics — " 

But my attention was distracted at this point by one of the 
circulars, which displayed an array of startling, cheering, alluring 
words, followed by plentiful exclamation points, that, like a hunch 
of keys, opened to my enraptured vision the gates of a terrestrial 
Paradise, where Bridgets should he no more, and where ill-cooked 
meals should become a mechanical impossibility. The boon we 
had been sighing for now presented itself for my acceptance, an 
accomplished fact. Harrison Ely had invented "An Automatic 
Household Beneficent Genius. — A Practical Realization of the 
Fabled Familiar of the Middle Ages," So the circular set forth. 

Returning to the letter, I read that Harrison Ely, having ex- 
hausted his means in working out his invention, was unable to 
manufacture his "machine" in quantity as yet; but that he had 
just two on hand which he would sell in order to raise some ready 
money. He hoped that I would buy one of his automatons, and aid 
him to sell the other. 

Never did a request come at a more propitious moment. I had. 
always entertained a kindness for Harrison Ely, and now such 
was my disgust at the incompetence of Bridget and Juliana 
and tlieir predecessors that I was eager to stake the price of a 
"Household Beneficent Genius" on the success of my friend's 
invention. 

So, having grasped the purport of the circulars and letter, I 
broke forth to my wife : 

" My dear, you've heard me speak of Harrison Ely — " 



10 ELYS AUTOMATIC HOUSEMAID. 

" That man who is always so near doing something great, and 
never has done anything ? " said she. 

" He has done it at last I " I declared. » Harrison Ely is one of 
the greatest geniuses the world has ever seen. He has invented 
an ' Automatic-Electric Machine-Servant.' " 
My wile said, " Oh ! " 

There was not an atom of enthusiasm in that ." Oh ! " hut I m 
not lo be daunted. 

"I am ready," I resumed, " to invest my bottom dollar in tica 
of Harrison Ely's machine-servants." 

Her eyes were Used upon me as if they would read my very 
soul. " What do they cost 1 " she mildly asked. 

"In comparison will, the benefits to be derived, little enough. 
Listen I " I seized a circular al random, and began to read : 

'■Tile Automatic Household Renins, a veritable DomosHe 
Fairy, swift, silent, sure; a Permanent, Inalienable, Krstolass 
Servant, warranted to give Satisfaction." 

"AhP'satdmyirifei and Hie enthusiasm that was lacking in 
the » 01, ! " nude itself elo.pieut in that " Ah 1 " « What is the 
price ? " she asked again, 

" The price is all right, and we are going to try tho experiment," 
"Are we though <*" said she, between doubt and desire. 
" Moat assuredly ; it will bo a saving in the end. I shall write 
to Harrison Ely ,his reiy night." 

The relnrn mail brought me a reply slating that tw» Electric 
Automatic Household Beneficent Geniuses had been shipped ins ' 
by express. The letter enclosed a pamphlet that gave a more 
particular account of the E. A. H. B. G. than the circulars con- 
tained. My friend's invention was shaped in the likeness of the 
human figure, with body, head, arms, legs, hands and feet. It was 
clad m waterproof cloth, with a hood of the same to protect the 
head, and was shod mill felt. Tho trunk contained the wheels 
and springs, and in the head was faed the electric battery. The 
face, of bisque, was described as possessing •• a very natural and 
pleasing expression." 

Just at dusk ,™ oblong box arrived by express and was duly 
delivered ill our hall, hut ntmy wife's urgent entreaty I consented 
not to unpack the machines until next day. 



ELV'S AUTOMATIC liul'.SLIMA [ I l 17 

"If we should not get the knack of managing them, they might 
give us trouble," said this wise wife of mine. 

I agreed to this, and having sent away Bridget with a week's 

wages, to the .satisfaction of all parties, we went to lied in high 
hopes. 

Early next morning we were astir. 

" My deal'," I said, " do not give yourself the least concern about 
breakfast; lam determined that Harrison's invention shall have 
fair play." 

" Very well," my wife assented ; but she prudently administered 
bread and butter to her offspring. 

I opened the oblong box, where lay the automatons side by side, 
their hands placidly folded upon fcheii waterproof breasts, and 
their eyes looking placidly expectant from under their WEterprooJ 
hoods. 

I confess the sight gave me a shock. Anna Maria turned pale ; 
the children hid fcheii faces in her skirts. 

" Once out of the box," I said to myself, " and the horror will 
be over." 

The machines stood on their feet admirably, but the horror 
was not materially lessened by this change of position. However, 
I assumed a bold front, and said, jocosely : 

"Now, which is Bridget, and which is Juliana — which the 
cook, and which the housemaid ? " 

This distinction was made clear by dial-plates and indicators, 
set conspicuously between the shoulders, an opening being cut in 
the waterproof for that purpose. The housemaid's dial-plate was 
stamped around the circumference with the words: Bed, Broom, 
Duster, Door-bell, Dining-room Service, Parlor Service, etc. In 
like manner, the cook's dial-plate bore the words that pertained to 
her department. I gave myself first to "setting" the housemaid, 
as being the simpler of the two. 

" Now, my dear," said I, confidently, " we shall see how thu 
Juliana can make the beds." 

I proceeded, according to the pamphlet's directions, to point the 
indicator to the word H Bed." Next, as there were three beds to 
be made, I pushed in three of the five little red points surround- 
ing the word. Then I set the -clock " connected with the indica- 



18 ELY'S AUTOMATIC H0USKMA1D. 

tor, for a thirty minutes' jolt, thinking it might take about ten 
minutes to a bed. I did not consult my wife, for women do not 
understand machinery, and any suggestion of hesitancy on my 
pail would have demoralized her. 

The last tiling in !»■ done was to connect the indicator with the 
battery, a simple enough performance in itself, but the pamphlet 
of directions gave a repeated and red-lettered " caution," never 
to interfere with the machine while it was at work I I therefore 
issued the command, " Non-combatants to the rear 1 " aud was 
promptly obeyed. 

What happened nest I do not pretend to account for. By what 
subtle and mysterious action of electricity, by what unerring 
affinity, working through a marvellous mechanism, that Electrie- 
Automalic Household Beneficent Genius, whom — or which, for 
short — we called Juliana, sought its appropriate task, is the in- 
ventor's secret. I don't undertake to explain, I merely narrate. 
With a "click " the connection was made, and the new Juliana 
Went ■nji-itai.ru at a brisk and business-like pace. 

Wo followed in breathless amazement. In less than five minutes, 
bed number one was made, and in a twinkling the second was 
taken in hand, and number three also was fairly accomplished, 
long before the allotted thirty minutes hail expired. By this time, 
familiarity had somewhat dulled that awe and wonder with which 
we had gaped upon the first performance, and I beheld a smile of 
hopeful satisfaction rm my wife's anxious countenance. 

Our youngest, a boy aged three, was quick to feel the genial 
influence of this smile, and encouraged thereby, he bounced into 
the middle of the first bed. Hardly had lie alighted there, when 
OOP automaton, having finished making the third bed, returned fco 
Iiit Brat job, and, before we could imagine mischief, the mattresses 
were jerked about, and the child was tumbled, headforemost on 
the floor! 

Had the flesh-ai id-blood Juliana been guilty of such an act, she 
should have been dismissed on the spot; but, as it was, no one of 
us ventured so much as a remonstrance. My wife lifted the 
screaming child, and the imperturbable machine went on to re- 
adjust [lie bed with mechanical exactitude. 

At this point a wild shout of mingled exultation, amazement and 



ELY'S AUTOMATIC HOUSEMAID. 19 

terror arose from below, and we hastened down-stairs to told our 
SOU Joliu hugging his elbows and capering frantically in front of 
the kitchen-door, where the electric cook was stirring empty noth- 
ing in a pan, with a seal worthy a dozen eggs. 

My eldest hopeful, impelled by that spirit of enterprise inn! 
audacity oharaoteristie of nine-year-old boys, had ventured to ex- 
periment with the kitchen automaton, .and by sheer accident had 
effected a working connection between the battery and tlic indica- 
tor, and the machine, in "going off," had given the boy a blow 
that made him feel, as he expressed it, " like a funny-bone all 
over." 

"And served you right!" cried I. The thing wns set for an 
ho«T and a half of work, according to the showing of the dial- 
plate, and no chance to stop it before I must leave for my office. 
Had the materials been supplied, we might have had breakfosl , 
but, remembering the red-lettered "cAUTroN," wo dared not 
supply materials while that indefatigable spoon whs gyrating in 
theemptypan. For my distraction, Kitty, iny daughter of B6VS0 
years, now called to me from up-stairs : 

" Papa, you letter come, quick 1 It's a-tearin' up these hods ! " 
" My dear," I sighed, " there's no way to stop it. "We'll have to 
wait for the works to run down. I must call Harrison's attention 
to this defect. He ought to provide some sort of brake." 

"We went up-stairs again. The B. G. Juliana stood beside the 
bed wdiich she had just torn up for the sixth or seventh time, when 
.suddenly she became, so to speak, paralyzed ; her arms, in the act 
of spreading the sheets, dropped by her sides, her back stiffened, 
and siie stood absolutely motionless, leaving her job unfinished — 
the B. G. would move no more until duly "set " again. 

I now discovered that I was hungry. "If that Fiend in the 
kitchen were only at work about something substantial, instead ol 
whipping the air into imaginary omelettes ! " I groaned. 

"Never mind," said my wife; "I've a pot of coffee on the 
kerosene stove." 

Bless herl She was worth a thousand Beneuoent Geniuses, and 
so I told her. 

I did not return until late, but I was in good spirits, and I 
greeted my wife gayly : 



KLY'a AUTOMATIC HOUSEMAID. 
'• Well, how do they work?" 

e*cited,y, ».nd , oiled them, wM^l*^ ££** 
•(WO. According to the directions, I p„ m ,d tlfe ol , T' 

nonsense! I hat a your imagination." 
"Very well," said Anna Maria. "You eat, .In a -r ■ 

£~ p, took . g00d Jeal thia m -.»' f ; .™ ..* . 

^Pl.™n ; , 8 ,td„w„ And theywoAed-^™ ,, ,, 
Bend m the kitchen has cooked ,11 the provisions 7 Z ■ 

™p*«^,h„t s tiii B he g „„o„,a„d^r:: :i zrz;" 

" I'm not so sure about that 1 » she retorted. .. A „ for tlle „,, 

one- 1 set it sweeping, ,„d it is sweeping .till , •■ ° °"' er 

We ate the dinner prepared by the kitchen Fiend, and reallv I 

JJMJ - time ,„ spare Anna Maria the triuufph jZ£££ 

ho.il. Therefore, as soon as the Juliana had ,„] h „ s „i „ v i f f 
of dnstin the middle of the hall I„]„, „ 1 ! P '' e 

everytlnng m confusion, my ,„„„,„„„,, „..,, ^^^ 



ELY H AUTOMATIC HOUSEMAID. 2t 

"By George Washington 1 " I exclaimed. "The Thing's on 
time I " 

I needed no urging to make me forsake my pillow, but Anna 
Maria was ahead of me. 

" Now, my dear, don't get excited," I exhorted, but in vain. 

"Don't you hear?" she whispered, in terror. " The other 
one! — awe — eep — ingl" And she darted from the room. 

I paused to listen, and heard the patter of three pairs of little bare 
feet across the hall up-stairs. The children were following their 
mother. The next sound I heard was like the dragging of a rug 
along the floor. I recognized this peculiar sound as the footsteps 
of the B. G. Then came a dull thud, mingled with a shout from 
Johnnie, a scream from my wife, and the terrified cries of the two 
younger children. I rushed out just in time to see John, in his 
nighf>clothes, with his hair on end, tear down-stairs like a streak of 
lightning. My little Kitty and the three-year-old baby stood 
clasped in each other's arms at the head of the stairs, sobbing in 
terror, and, half-way down, was my wife, leaning over the railing, 
witli ashen face and rigid body, her fascinated gaze fixed upon a. 
dark and struggling mass in the hall below. 

John, when he reached the bottom of the stairs, began capering 
like a goat gone mad, digging the floor with his bare heels, clap- 
ping his hands with an awful glee, and shouting : 

" Bet your bottom dollar on the one that whips I " 

The Juliana and the Bridget were fighting for the broom I 

I comprehended the situation intuitively. The kitchen-clean- 
ing, for which the Fiend had been "set," bad reached a point that 
demanded the broom, and that subtle, attractive affinity, which my 
friend's genius had known how to produce, but had not learned to 
regulate, impelled the unerring automaton towards the only broom 
in the house, which was now in the bauds of its fellow-automatnn, 
and a struggle was inevitable. What I could not understand — 
Johnnie having kept his own counsel — was this uncontrollable 
sweeping impulse that possessed the Juliana. 

However, this was no time for investigating the exact cause of 
the terrific row now going on in our front hall. The Beneficent 
Geniuses had each a firm grip of the broom-handle, and they 
might have performed the sweeping very amicably together, could 



22 ELY'S AUTOMATIC HOUBEMAID. 

they but have agreed as to the field of labor, but their conflicting 
tendencies on this point brought about a rotary motion that sent 
tlicin spinning around the hall, and kept them alternately cracking 
each other's head with a violence that ought to have drawn blood. 
Considering their life-likenesa, we should hardly have thought it 
StaftBge if blood had flowed, and it would have been a relief had 
the combatants but called each other names, so much did their 
dumbness intensify the horror of a struggle, in the midst of whieh 
the waterproof hoods fell off, revealing their startlingly human 
countenances, not distorted by angry passions, but resolute, inex- 
oi-able, calm, as though each was sustained in the contest by a 
lofty sense of duty. 

' "They're alive! Kill 'em! Kill 'em, quick 1" shrieked my 
wife, as the gyrating couple moved towards the stair-case. 

"Let'em alone," said Johnnie — his sporting blood, which he 
inherits from his father, thoroughly roused — dancing about the 
automatic pugilists in delight, and alternately encouraging the 
one or the other to increased efforts. 

Thus the fight went on with appalling energy and reckless 
courage on both sides, my wife wringing her hands upon the stair- 
case, our infants wailing in terror upon the landing above, and I 
wavering between an honest desire to see fair play and an appre- 
hensive dread of consequences which was not unjustified. 

In one of their frantic gyrations the figures struck the hat-rack 
and promptly converted it into a mass of splinters. In a minute 
more they became involved with a rubber plant — the pride of my 
wife's heart — and distributed it impartially all over the premises. 
From this they caromed against the front door, wrecking both its 
stained-glas3 panes, and then down the length of the hall they 
sped again, fighting fiercely and dealing one another's imperturba- 
ble countenances ringing blows with the disputed broom. 

We became aware through Johnnie's excited comments, that 
Juliana had lost an ear in the fray, and presently it was discerni- 
ble that a fractured nose had somewhat modified the set geniality 
of expression that had distinguished Kridget's face in its prime. 

How this fierce and equal combat would have culminated 
if further prolonged no one but Harrison Ely can conjecture, but 
it came to an abrupt termination as the parlor clock chimed eight. 



ELY S AtfTOMATIO HOUSEMAID. 23 

the hour when the two automatons should have completed ilieir 
appointed tasks. 

Though quite late at ray office that morning, I wired Ely 
before attending to business. Long-haired, gaunt and haggard, 
but cheerful as ever, he arrived next day, on fire with enthusiasm. 
He could hardly be persuaded to refresh himself with a cup of 
coffee before he took his two recalcitrant Geniuses in hand. It 
was curious to see him examine each machine, much as a physician 
would examine a patient. Finally his brow cleared, be gave a 
little puff of satisfaction, and exclaimed; 

"Why, man alive, there's nothing the matter — not a thing! 
What you consider a defect is really a merit — merely a surplus 
of mental energy. They've had too big a dose of oil. Few house- 
keepers have any idea about proper lubrication," and he emitted 
another little snort, at which my wife colored guiltily. 

"I Bee just what's wanted," he resumed. "The will-power 
generated and not immediately expended becomes cumulative and 
gets beyond control, I'll introduce a little compensator, to take 
up the excess and regulate the How. Then a child can operate 
them." 

It was now Johnnie's turn to blush. 

" Ship 'em right back to the factory, and we'll have 'em all right 
in a few days. I see where the mechanism can be greatly im- 
proved, and when you get 'em again I know you'll never consent 
to part with 'em ! " 

That was four mouths ago. The " Domestic Fairies " have not 
yet been returned from 11 unison's laboratory, hut lam confidently 
looking for the familiar oblong packing case, and expect any day 
to see in the papers the prospectus of the syndicate which Ely in- 
forms me is being "promoted" to manufacture bis automatic 
boil se maid. 




The Curse of Zulma Rebya.* 

BY KHETA CHILDE DORR. 

|]N the latter half of the thirties, at the court of 
Louis Philippe, the democratic atmosphere 
brought by the "Citizen King" from his 
American sojourn was voted by old courtiers 
— especially the Indies- — -a very unsatisfactory 
substitute for the manners thab went out when 
Charles X. departed into exile and the last traditions of the old 
regime went with him, 

Sometimes there were fetes, which had management more often 
than not converted into fiascos — in the opinion of the Faubourg 
Saint Germain — hut there were those whom they amused and 
who could laugh with as well as at the fatuous monarch. Among 
them was Lady Florence Brooke, whose father — one of the most 
efficient statesmen of his day in England — was then in Paris on 
an important and delicate mission. 

"I vow, cousin," she said, the morning after one of these in- 
congruous gatherings, to dipt. Arbuthnot, a dashing young at- 
tache", "I am in love with His Majesty. He is the only man in 
Paris who makes me laugh." 

"The King is rather quaint at times," agreed the captain. 
"But I hope, for all that, dear Florence, you will not be tempted 
to laugh audibly." 

" Never fear, I know why my father was sent here, and it will 
not be my fault if his mission fails." 

" I am sorry you are so bored, my cousin," resumed the young 
Englishman, " but there are sonic amusing people in society besides 
the King. And that reminds me of some one who is anxious to 
be presented to you — none other than the renowned Count 
Abbas." 

" A ml who is he — an Arab ? " 

■i',.|,y.iplu, im, i.TTlieSliurfLiiry flibliBhlng CompHny. All rights reserved. 



THE CCRSE Off ZULU A BBSYA, 2,5 

"An Egyptian — or, rather, a pure-blooded Turk. He is one 
of those whom old Mehemet AH chose in carrying out his pecul- 
iarly Oriental scheme for the civilization of Egypt. He selected 
three hundred youths from good families, many of them from the 
very highest nobility, and sent them, here to Europe, to he edu- 
cated as engineers, naval officers, phyaieiaus and mechanics. When 
they came back he had them all clapped into prison, and there 
they were obliged to stop until they had translated their text- 
books into Arabic. Then some of them were released, but the 
majority were turned into schoolmasters. Awful degradation to 
an Oriental, you know. 

'• Well, this chap, this Abbas — he has a jolly lot of names and 
titles, but «e call him simply Count Abbas — was of the famous 
three hundred. He somehow got wind of the scheme, and very 
sensibly failed to return with the others. So he's a Parisian, now, 
and upon my word he isn't a bad one, He's immensely rich, as 
clever as Lucifer, and no end popular at the clubs. May I present 
him '.' He might interest you." 

" I wish Mehemet Ali were here ! " cried Lady Florence. " I 
should adore him. But in his default I think the count may do." 

Capt. Arbuthnot took his leave, well pleased to have been a 
little useful to his fair kinswoman. He Imped, some day, (Than 
he should inherit his title, to become indispensable to her. 

He was not the only man who aspired to so much distinction, 
for Lady Florence Brooke was a very beautiful woman. She was 
also very brilliant, a combination not frequently encountered. In 
conclusion, she was selfish, which is commoner. 

It ought to be said, in her behalf, that every formative influence, 
every detail of her education, had been such as to cultivate selfish- 
ness in even less promising soil. From childhood she had beeu 
encouraged to believe herself infinitely above others of her sex, 
both in beauty and intellect. Flattered, deferred to, consulted and 
confided in by her father and his friends, she had early attained 
an elevation of self-esteem which was far too lofty to lie styled 
mere vanity. 

After his first disappointment that he had a daughter instead of 
a son, her father resolved to make the motherless girl what he 
conceived to be a perfect woman. 



2b THE CURSK OF ZULMA EEBVA. 

In his own opinion — and in hers — he had been completely 
successful. She knew mathematics like a Senior Wrangler, Latin 
like a cardinal, and her beautiful lips rolled honeyed Greek like 
a reincarnated Helen. 

By the time she entered society she was quite satisfied that she 
was superior, by virtue of personality, to any and all rank. 

She was now six-and-twenty, and unmarried, despite off era. 

" The thing is simply this, Papa," explained the young woman, 
" I intend to become a model for wives as soon as the man appears 
whom I thoroughly respect, and who aeve-1 bores me. As yet I 
have net found the two quali ueations emliodied in one individual." 

Haply this was repeated to Capt. Arbuthnot. At all events 
the day after he had presented Count Abbas, the Kgyptian ap- 
proached him ami said : " My dear Arbuthnot, if you will tell 
me how to please your houri of a cousin, I promise to smuggle 
you into the paradise of true believers, hereafter ! " 

"Why, my dear chap," answered the attache" seriously, " noth- 
ing is easier. In the first place you must amuse her! And if 
you can't do that, impress her! If you should succeed in doing 
both — well, in that ease you would certainly prove yourself an 
all-around man." 

Count Abbas did not, at first, succeed in doing either. Lady 
Florence was disappointed to find him so little out of the com- 
mon. His complexion was bo swarthier than many a Frenchman's, 
although his hair and beard were of a peculiar blue-black seldom 
seen in Europe, and be had the soft, dull eyes of an Oriental. 
For the rest, he was a fair type of the ordinary young Parisian 
dandy of the day. 

Occasionally there crept into his speech an accent, a figure, an 
allusion, an evasive essence, that was distinctly alien, and he soon, 
divining that these subtle differences were pleasing to her, began 
to affect them. After that she was more gracious, and before 
long a certain intimacy was established between them. She 
allowed him to say to her — in bis Orieutal fashion — things 
which from others would have been coldly received. She was not 
above a flirtation, but love-making offended her taste. 

This woman, with the brain of a man, possessed the rudimentary 
emotional nature of a child. She had, in place of affections, pas- 



THE CUKSE OP ZCLMA EEBYA. 27 

sions, instincts, merely a devouring curiosity, a love of change, a 
desire for sensation. 

Because lie fed this restless flame Count Abbas cliarmed her. 
The intensity of his feeling for her, if she noticed it at all, caused 
her no concern. She did not wish to indict suffering, hut no 
impulse to prevent it had ever entered her mind. 

Lady Florence's favorite jewels were rubies, and of these the 
count had some rarely beautiful specimens. When she spoke one 
day of the enduring nature of such gems he answered with a 
strange smilo : 

" My rubies are older than I, to be sure, hut they will not neces- 
sarily endure longer." 

She laughed delightedly. " So you have the elixir of life 1 " 

" I did not say so. Truly, I am no seer. But I have a certain 
unique advantage over other men. I know the exact spot on 
earth where my death must occur I Of course I shall never visit 
that place as long as I desire to live. It follows that I am im- 
mortal, if I choose to be." 

"And how, pray, did you come into this valuable intelli- 
gence 1 " 

" It is an inheritance. I had it from my father's lips, as he had 
it in secret from his father, whose father confided it to him." 

" And yet — they died I " 

" Yes, they died. But I need not die. Will you condescend 
to hear the tale ? " 

" Continue." 

The young man leaned far back into the red cushions of his 
chair, and as he did so, a beam of the late afternoon sun caught 
the rubies in his hand, quickening them into flame. His gaze 
rested on them in silence, and a sudden melancholy came into his 
handsome, sallow face. His eyes glowed dully, like banked (ires. 
At this moment he was not in the least Parisian. Lady Florence 
regarded him with admiration, as she would have admired a rare 
vase, or a marble, or an edition — anything perfect of its kind. 
As the sunbeam passed, his melancholy also passed, and he spoke 
in his ordinary light-hearted tone. 

" The story reflects such small credit on one of my ancestors 
that family pride ought to prevent ray telling it. But what is the 



^ B THE CDR3B OF ZULMA RffBXA. 

sin of ingratitude weighed against the infinite happiness of fur- 
nishing you entertainment? Know then, my lady, that when 
your slave's great-grandfather was little more than a stripling, he 
was sent on an important mission to the city of Damascus. Hav- 
ing arrived, he was hastening to the house of the dignitary to 
whom his letters were addressed, when he was abruptly halted try 
a great crowd of people, which completely filled the narrow street. 
It may have been a fire, "or a religious riot; at all events, there 
was so much excitement that my great-grands ire wasted no time 
in taking refuge in a narrow alley between two tall houses hard 

by. 

» Three other persons had preceded them thither; two women 
seated on asses, attended by an immense black eunuch. One of 
the women was old, evidently a duenna. The other my impres- 
sionable ancestor easily surmised to he young and beautiful. 
Both of them were frightened out of their senses. It was obvi- 
ously the part of a brave young man to reassure them. The 
blockade lasted a long time. What would you have ? The end 
of it all — or the beginning of it all, rather— was a visit the next 
day from the old woman, an appointment, a disguise, a meeting! 
Indeed lady, these things happen in the East as frequently as in 
the West. 

"The fair one proved to be the daughter of a Jewish merchant. 
She was motherless, and somewhat neglected. Tradition pre- 
serves that she was, as it were, a willow wand for grace and 
elegance, and her face was as the moon when it rises on the four- 
teenth night. At the first dropping of her veil my ancestor's wit 
was confounded and his reason was unsettled. They conversed 
together, timidly at first, afterwards with boldness. 

" In that country women are not coquettes. They are children 
in mind and heart, and their passions are as the winds of the 
desert. Thus Zulma Rebya awoke to love as from a deep sleep) 

"I will not attempt to give you the details of the affair. In 
the first place, I do not know them — I only know that the end 
came very suddenly. My great-grandsire received a summons 
from home, and was obliged to go with hardly an adieu. In the 
East no man marries without his parents' consent, and even if lie 
had wished to wed his Jewish lady-love it would never have been 



THE CUR8K OF ZtJLMA RBBYA. 29 

permitted. So be left Damascus alone. The damsel was, as 
usual, unreasonable. What aays your poet? ' Hell hath no fury 
like a woman scorned.' 

"As my great- grands ire set forth on his journey he was obliged 
to pass the spot where he had seen her first, and behold, the old 
woman was waiting for him with a letter in her hand. As he 
took the writing a chill like that of the tomb came over him. 
And no wonder I For it contained no tender farewell, but a ter- 
rible and a prophetic curse. 

"'Thou goest out from the gates of the city where thou didst 
promise to abide until death found thee within. That promise 
shalt thou still keep. Here shalt thou die, and never slialt thou 
die save only here. Thou and thy son and thy son's sons, as long 
as they have sons. By the virtue of my mother.' 

"My ancestor journeyed on and in due season came to Ins own 
country, where he lived and completed his manhood and married 
wives after the custom of our holy religion. Zulma Rebya be- 
came as a shadow and her bitter words were, in time, almost for- 
gotten. Almost, but not completely; for when, twenty-five years 
later, affairs involving a large inheritance made it imperative fin- 
one of the family to go to Damascus, my great-grandfather refused 
to part with his sons. He did not believe very strongly in curses, 
but if there was a risk he preferred to take it on himself. 

"His business was soon accomplished, and in twenty-four hours 
he was ready to leave the fateful city. But leave he never did, 
for the cholera was abroad, and he perished in agony, and his 
ashes were scattered to the winds. 

" His eldest son, my grandfather, rose to distinction in the ser- 
vice of the Sultan, who thought so highly of him that he was 
often entrusted with delicate matters of diplomacy in foreign 
lands. It was finally decreed that one of the embassies involved 
certain negotiation with a great Sheik of the Eedawin, whose 
desert home was near the city of our destiny. Whether or not 
my grandfather hesitated to go 1 cannot say, hut it is probable 
that he accepted his mission as a soldier his post at the enemy's 
front; a duty to be done, even to the death. 

" The conference with the Bedawi lasted several days, nearly a 
week, and resulted to the Sultan's advantage. But other lips than 



6l) THE CUHSE OP ZULMA REBYA. 

the ambassador's brought back the tidings. Himself was killed in 
a street brawl at the very gates of the city. 

« When my father, then nearly twenty-one, heard of his father's 
murder in Damascus, the curse of Znlma Rebya fell heavy on his 
bouI. He was a gloomy man — I think I never heard his laughter 
— but he was a brave man as well, and his life was as active and 
as useful as though no dead woman's hand pointed him to a shame- 
fid doom. He was Mehemet Ali's nearest friend, and when that 
great man conquered Egypt, he made my father a marshal oi bis 
army. 

" In 1830, as you have heard, I was sent with other youths, to 
Europe ; but, unlike the others, I did not return. My father, 
friend of Mehemet, still had no desire to see his own son made 
into a pedagogue by the tyrant, and I was warned in time. If I 
had been at home — " he paused, and a touch of genuine emotion 
broke his voice. 

" What then ? " cried Lady Florence, with impatience. 
" If I had been at home my father should not have gone." 
" He went I " 

" Second in command to Ibrahim, whose army captured Damas- 
cus in '34. Many perished in that bloody straggle, and among 
the first — my father." 

Lady Florence was as pale as death. 

" And do you really believe in it ? " she asked breathlessly. 
The young man shrugged his shoulders. 

She, recovering herself, began to laugh. » Tell me, then, my 
dear Count, how long do you intend to live ? If I remember, none 
of your few f ellow-immortals found an unending existence an actual 
boon. At what age will yon elect that famous journey to 
Damascus?" 

" Ah, Lady Florence," answered the Oriental, rising and coming 
quickly to her. " A short time since I fancied that I should never 
go, but now I know that I desire to live only as long as you do. 
And I shall start to-morrow unless you tell me that I may spend 
every day of the future near to you — nearer than any other, man 
or woman." 

She stood up in amazement, and motioned him back with an 
authoritative hand. 



THE OUKSB OF ZTJLMA REBYA. 81 

"Oh do not reply at once," he cried passionately. "0 Moon 
of Paradise, listen a moment longer ! You are used to be wor- 
shipped, but not by a man of my raoe. You have heard words of 
love, but not in the golden language which I shall teach you. If 
I am your husband, you will say that in Europe men do not know 
how to love at all: You will declare that no other woman in the 
world is a wife." 

In spite of herself, Lady Florence was shaken by his stormy 
ardor. Her cold breast even caught a faint reflective glow. She 
sank into her chair trembling, and he fell down beside her, possess- 
ing her hands with liis lips. 

" My princess I You will ? You will ? " 

" Butyou — " she stammered. " A Turk — a Mohammedan — " 

"I am not a Turk, I am not a Mohammedan. I have no coun- 
try, no religion, if any on the earth offend you. Your nation is 
mine, and the room that holds you is the mosque where I will go 
to prayer, for the rest of our days." 

" My father will never consent." 

Why was it impossible for her to dismiss the man outright ? 

"I have already satisfied your father that I am a suitable alli- 
ance. He leaves you perfectly free to accept me if you choose." 

"I do not wish to marry yet." 

"Ah, but when you do! It is all I ask, that you consent to 
marry me when you are ready." 

" But, good heavens I I am not even ready to do that," she 
cried desperately. 

" At least you do not reject me. By Allah, I will uot go to 
Damascus yet I " 

And every day afterwards when he left her, he murmured over 
her hand: "0 my lady, do I journey to Damascus to-morrow? " 

And every day the question was asked more ardently, more 
confidently, for she was never quite able to say " go ! " 

She bad not the remotest intention of accepting him. He did 
not fulfil the first condition which she had assured her father was 
necessary to her choice, and she foresaw that, as her lover, he 
would soon cease to devote himself to merely amusing her. 

Then why did she not dismiss him ? Not because she feared 
to cause his death. Lady Florence was not superstitious. The 



8 ^ BHH CUK8E OF ZDLMA ItEBYA. 

plain truth is that he overbore her with his personality ; he was 
so near to being her master that .she was afraid of him. 

The situation soon became intolerable. She, hitherto so proud, 
so iusolent in her strength of mind, stooped now to weakly pon- 
dering schemes for getting rid of him, and she believed she had 
hit upon that which would compel him to abandon his suit. She 
knew that, in the Oriental character, superstition, dread of curses, 
belief in the evil eye, is so ingrained as to be structural. She 
resolved to make this fact her weapon. 

Listening one afternoon to his fervid eloquence, she said a ifl I v, 
"I beg of you a little time for reflection. All the world ie on its 
way to Rome for the Carnival. Go you too, and- the very hour 
when you return you shall have your answer." 

He drew a long breath, his black eyes devouring her passion- 
ately. Then he bowed to the ground, whispered " I hear and 
obey," and was gone. 

The answer was handed Count Abbas two weeks later, to the 
day. Its first effect was to transform him to appearance into a 
maniac. Looked Id his chamber, he rushed blindly up and down 
until, utterly exhausted, he fell on the divan, clenched his bands 
above bis head, and sobbed like a hurt animal. At length, his 
rage spent, he sat up very pale and calm. 

" One of them lived a week," he muttered. " If I live a week, 
I shall have time for love, and for revenge also. If I live only a 
day, as the first one did — or a few hours, or one hour — she is 
not worth it, but my desire for her is worth it. Perhaps I will 
strangle her at the end. I ought to do it." 

He opened the door and said to his Egyptian servant: •• Ismail, 
put things together for a sea voyage." 

On the flat roof of the British consulate in Damascus Lady 
Florence sat, peacefully enjoying the divine love story of the 
nightingale. She was thinking of the European letters, due 
probably on the morrow. Her father's would be furious, but she 
could always pacify him. If Abbas wrote at all, his letter would 
be unpleasant, but then— she was not obliged to read it. When 
she relumed to Paris, she felt confident, the count would be 
abroad. She listened for another hour to the nightingale, chatted 



THE CUBSE OF ZULMA BEBTA. 33 

with the consul and his wife, a cousin, of her mother, and went 
down to her placid pillow. 

The foreign post arrived the next day and so did Count Abbas. 

The interview between them was very brief. In the cold 
pallor, the averted eye, the wordless greeting of the woman who 
entered the room to receive him, he read the troth before anything 
was spoken. 

" I did not intend this," she said. "I did not dream that it 
would happen. You would not let me refuse you, and I believed 
that I could elude you by coming here. It was a stupid plan, 
and I think very badly of myself. I hope you will forgive me, 
some day." 

She waited for him to speak, and his lips moved, but no sylla- 
ble escaped them. He looked at her with a hollow stare. Hia 
hut fell noisily to the floor; he picked it up, brushed it me- 
ohanioally, and resumed his expressionless gaze. 

Again she broke the painful silence : 

"lam sorry to hurt you. I did not intend to do so." 

With an effort, he answered in, a broken whisper: "Not your 
fault — the other one." 

He turned and felt his way through the door into the street, 
Whore Ismail was waiting. Later, they sought a barren lodging, 
which was to he their abiding place till the end should come. 
Abbas did not notice the poverty of the place. It was good 
enough to die in, and from out its portals be never went — alive. 

And did death find him? 

Verily, no man escapes his fate. 

And with what weapon was the blow dealt? 

With that which is often reserved for the least worthy among men 
— old age. 

He died at eighty-three — some years after Lady Florence 
Arbuthnot. 




To Save a Stainless Name,* 

BY CATHAKINE YOUNG GLEN. 

^\W/#j95l MONR the older residents of Tarry town, N. Y., 
■■ there are doubtless some wlio can still point out 
with interest the large, old-fashioned house, with 
pleasant walks and cool tree-arches, once the 
home of the Wall Street broker, J. H. Ihlefield. 
Mr. Ililefield's household was composed at that 
time — thirty years ago — of himself and wife, and a niece and 
nephew, twenty and twenty-one years of age, respectively, the 
children of his less fortunate brother, A. V. Ihlefield, then many 
years dead. Though the uncle had discharged wisely and faith- 
fully the duties of a parent towards the orphans, the nephew — 
"Harry" as he was called — had disappointed his expectations, 
and instead of showing a disposition to settle down into a man of 
affaire, seemed to regard all forms of business with aversion, The 
niece, Margaret, on the other hand, was not only a girl of unusual 
beauty and spirit, but of business aptitude as well. 

During the month of August, 1867, Mr. and Mrs. Ihlefield and 
Miss Margaret were visiting at Saratoga Springs— having closed 
the house at Tarrytown — hut the wild Harry declined to accom- 
pany them, declaring that Saratoga was too hot and dull, and that 
he should go yachting with friends. 

The family had been hut a short time at Saratoga when a matter 
of business arose which made it necessary for some one of the 
family to return to Tarrytown at once for its adjustment. At this 
juncture Mrs. Ihlefield, never strong, was taken suddenly and quite 
seriously ill. As it was thought unadvisable for her husband to 
lie absent, Miss Margaret herself undertook the errand, leaving 
Saratoga by an early train. 

" The papers will be signed by half-past four," she said to her 
uncle, at parting, bidding him affectionate farewell, " and by five 

• Cftpjrlfbt, 1SB9, by The Sliorlstory Publlnhlng Company. All rights reserve. 



TO BAVE A STAINLESS NAME. 85 

you may think of me as with the Wests." The Wests, with 
whom she intended to spend the night in Tarrytown, were near 
neighbors and friends. 

The day was close and dusty, the journey tiresome. The ac- 
complishment of her business proved a lengthier matter than Miss 
Margaret had thought. Certain details of it she was obliged, 
even then, to leave over until the following morning. It was not, 
therefore, until after six that she presented herself, a graceful but 
weary figure, at the door of her friends, the Wests. She was met 
there with disappointment and perplexity. The house was closed. 
They had gone, as she afterward learned, a week sooner than 
intended. The only other friend upon whose hospitality she 
would have cared, at this hour, unannounced and travel-stained, 
to intrude, was likewise out of town. 

She was averse to going to a hotel. Owing to the nature of 
her errand, and purposing so early a return, she did not wish her 
presence generally known. She turned again slowly into the 
street, and for a moment stood irresolute. 

Her own deserted home, half a block beyond, gleamed white 
through the veil of green, its windows catching the last faint rays 
of sun. A vision of comfort rose before her, enchanting to her 
tired soul — her own delightful room — and an impulse, growing 
into sudden, daring determination, gained possession of the girl. 
She felt for the latch-key in her bosom, and a few momenta later 
was fitting it to the lock. 

"No one will be the wiser! " she exulted, with a laugh and a 
■little natural shiver, as she stepped into the silent hall. She was 
correct. So quietly did she move about, so carefully did she shield 
her light, that neither the officer who at intervals patrolled the 
avenue, nor the watchman whose duty it was to make a round of 
the grounds between the hours of ten and twelve received a hint 
of her presence. 

After a hasty tour of the house, to convince herself that she was 
really alone — a trial, even to a spirit so courageous — she went 
at once to her own bedroom, and remained there through the 
evening, with her thoughts and her books. 

This room, furnished with every luxury, had large front windows 
on the west, looking out upon the avenue ; opposite, at the eastern 



"™ TO SAVE A STAINLESS NAME. 

end, a door opened into a dressing-room, which in its turn com- 
municated with the hall. On the south, and facing the great 
Louis XIV. bed, which stood against, the northern wall, was a 
pentagonal alcove, formed by a bay window. In the broad space 
between ita windows stood a dresser, and an archway, richly cur- 
tained, half divided it from the room. 

It was some- time past twelve before Miss Margaret decided to 
retire. Placing her watch, together with the costly rings she 
always wore, in a little jewel-box, she shut it away in the drawer 
of a table between the avenue windows, and removed the key. 
This she put beneath her pillow. 

Her preparations for the night concluded, she extinguished her 
light, and, folding back the screening blinds, lingered a moment 
at the open window in the alcove. The moon, now full, had 
turned the Ihlefleld grounds into one great checkerboard, lying in 
vivid squares of light and shadow. It seemed to Margaret that 
she had never witnessed a more beautiful scene, nor known a 
silence so profound. The vines about the trellis, moon-enthralled, 
seemed made of trailing stone. She herself, standing in that 
splendor, in one of those dreams of billowy whiteness with which 
women of her position and wealth arc wont to robe themselves 
for night, would have defied the cunning of the sculptor. 

Every trace of fear, the result of her unusual situation, melted 
away before that majesty of repose. Leaving the alcove windows 
so that the full tide might pour into the bedroom, she calmly laid 
her head upon the pillow, and almost immediately slept. 
She was to be rudely awakened. 

About half-past two — though she had then no notion of time — 
she came to herself with a sudden and peculiar sense of danger, 
that something which rouses us, as at the touch of a cold hand, 
from the numbness of deep sleep into more than two-fold conscious- 
ness. Instinct then compels us to be still, every nerve strained, 
every faculty alert. By not so much as the moving of a finger did 
Margaret betray herself as she opened her eyes. 

The room was still in a silvery glow, yet not as she had left it! 
She felt her heart to stop within her— then to beat with choking, 
suffocating violence. The sensation was unendurable. She sat 
upright, gasping, as for breath. 



TO HAVH A STAIWLESS NA.MIv, 37 

With the same motion the figure she saw in the alcove turned. 
A niekelled revolver, instantly levelled, sent its gleam across her 
i'ace. There was an interval of absolute suspense. Every minutest 
detail of the tableau before her stamped itself upon her eyes. The 
man was tall and stalwart, the lower half of las face clean-shaven, 
the upper hidden by a burglar's mask. He spoke, still covering 
her. His voice was distinctly audible, yet so low that she seemed 
to feel, rather than to hear it. 

" Make no alarm ! Keep perfectly quietl I mean you no harm 
if you will do so!" Then, as she neither attired nor spoke — 
" Do you give me your word ? " 

She had no recollection of what she said. She supposed that 
she must have answered as he desired. 

" Very well, then," the muffled voice continued, " I am going on 
with my work." Regarding her steadily, as though to assure him- 
self, he lowered the weapon. "Itemcmber! I shall hear you if 
you make the slightest sound ! " 

Sitting motionless, she could watch his every move. He began 
a rapid searching of the dresser. Drawer after drawer was turn- 
ing out its contents, under ids still, deft hand. 

Her whirling thoughts took shape, revolved about one central, 
towering idea. She was alone 1 Alone in an empty house, amid 
a. wilderness of abiubbery, on a deserted block, in the awfal aile&oe 
of night ! At all cost, at all hazard, she must conceal the fact from 
this man, who evidently from his fear that she would give an alarm 
did not know it. Let him but pass beyond her door, and he would 
rind it out ! She reasoned that he had come by her alcove window, 
which she had left open. If by that window iie could bo induced 
to go, without looking farther! If she could only satisfy him 
with what she had ! 

With an effort she leaned forward. The figure was bending 
over the last drawer of the dresser. She spoke rapidly, hardly 
above a whisper, hearing her own words aa though some one else 
were talking. 

"One moment! Will you listen?" He was silent, but from her 
first syllable showed attention. " Your staying here is dangerous to 
you, and misery to mo ! You must not disturb the other rooms ! 
If I make it worth your while will you go? Will you go at once?" 



3» Til BAV1 A STAINLESS NAME. 

She waited, but he did not answer. 

She dared again. Her breath was coining short and fast. 

" If I make it worth your while ? " 

The dark man regarded her furtively. Ho waa evidently un- 
convinced. 

" What is it of value that you have ? " he said. 

She quivered, with the hope of winning. 

" I have money and jewels I They will more than pay you ! 
Will you let me rise, that I may show you 'I Oh, will you promise 
me that you will go? " 

He stood, a tall, straight shadow, between the alcove curtains. 
Through the black blot upon his face she eould feel him search 
her soul. 

"I believe you are speaking the truth!" he said, at last. His 
voice was cool and deliberate. "Let rue have them, and I will 
leave you I " 

She threw a long, light cloak, lying by the bed, about her 
shoulders. "Stay where you are I" she commanded. "I shall 
not try to pass you ! " 

She took the little case from its biding in the table drawer. 
As she stood, the deep haying of a dog came up to her, from far 
down the avenue. Something in that sound, so grewsome in the 
dead of night, doubled the horror of her loneliness with that un- 
known man. She wavered, battling with herself. Every element 
in her past had its influence in that short, decisive fight with fear. 

She took a step toward him, and stopped, with eyes dilated. 
Then, all the pride of her family in her white-robed figure, she 
deliberately crossed the belt of moonlight to his side. Her face 
waa pule and resolute, her head thrown back, her rich hair falling 
alxmt her in a shimmering cloud. The jewels flashed within her 
hands. Never, perhaps, had that masked man beheld so radiant 
an apparition. 

He started, and stepped backward, but his gaze falling on the 
stones, he uttered an exclamation of deep, unfeigned delight. 

Still holding them, for he made no move to take them, she 
motioned to the window just behind him. 

"I have kept my word I" she said, with simple dignity. * I 
believe that you will now keep }'ours ! " 



TO SAVE A STAINLESS NAME. 39 

Taking the case she extended, he placed It Inaide his ooat, with 
a peculiar courtesy in the action, foreign to his kind. He turned, 
as though to obey her, then, hesitating, turned to her again. 
Something — it might have been a "thank you," it might Lave 
been some whimsical apology for the discourtesy Fate had thus 
driven him to offer her— parted the thin lips. What he would have 
said she never knew I In the next breath they were set, repelling, 
drawn across the teeth. 

Through the open dressing-room, leading to the hall, had some 
a sound which transfixed them bath. There was no mistake ! 
The knob of the door below, at the foot of the stairs, had tamed ! 

For an instant they faced each other, listening 1 The dark 
man's thought was written in his pose — it was that of the animal 
at bay I He was in danger I The house was awake ! 

But Margaret, in a flash, surmised the troth. Braving that 
housebreaker, nerved to her desperate ordeal, she realized that 
before which her courage melted down like snow. Her predica- 
ment— the strangest, maddest whim of chance — has never yet 
been paralleled, it ia likely never will be! The bouse had been 
entered again — from below I 

There was even then a creeping step upon tho stair ! 

Escape was easy for the burglar. The jewels were safe in bin 
bosom, he had all and more than he came to find ! Willi a silent 
oath ho sprang for the window — but the girl beside him was 
quicker than he I 

Scarce knowing what she did, she flung herself upon him and 
held him by the arms. Her slender hands were like bands of 
steel; her eyes, dark with terror, were upraised to his. 

She poured forth the secret, which she had given all to guard. 
Her blanched face was its guarantee of truth. 

" You cannot go ! You cannot leave me ! I am alone I " 

He struggled to free himself, to force her away, but she clung 
to him with the wild abandon of a child. She cried out to him, 
in sobbing whispers, in agonized entreaty: 

" Stay with me I Help me ! Help me I I am all alone I " 

As they heard the sound again her anus closed upon him. 

" Oh, for tlie love of God I " 

The eyes behind the mask burned down upon her. The thought 



hi 



: A STAtNLI-SS na.MK. 



at that moment behind fee eyes only God knew I Willi a gentle- 
ness, the mommy of which she earned to the grave, the man slid- 
donly forced her backward into the alcove and drew the curtail] 
so that it concealed them both. 

" Let go I " he commanded, in the same low tone. " My right 
hand mast be freo ! " 

She did as she was bidden, standing on the loft. Together 
Ihere, hidden, yet with every other object in the room In bright 
relief, they waited, listening to that coming, coming tap, tan, tap I 
Was it eternal ? Would it never end ? 

Margaret's eyes were riveted upon the lino whore the light in 
the bedroom lost itself in the shadow of the dressing-room beyond 
It seemed to her that if anything should disturb" il, at .I,.,,!,,,,. 
mm within it, she must shriek aloud. Vivid, swiftl v-changi,,- 
pictures began to pass and re-pass before her- every seen,, since 
her parting with her friends, every unimportant detail of the day 
just gone -only that betivist her and that familiar yesterday a 
timeless gulf now seemed to stretch. She was no more' of it then 
if it wore a dream I 

The step upon the stair had eeasod. There was perfect quiet, 
broken only hy the loud, bard beating of her heart. This stillness 
was awful; ,t wan worse than the sound. SI,,, oould not turn her 
head, yet she could half sec the figure at her side. She caught the 
shifting gleam from something on his right. 

Again there was movement! Somewhere there in that uncer- 
tain darkness of the dressing-room. 

She began to hear tie .wish and swirl „f waters rising aboul 
her, and to see the dancing of wave.. Something called her back 
-it was t],o dark man's hand on her wrist. That touch, reviving 
reassurnig her, transfusing its iron through her blood I She could 
look again, seeing as through a blur. 

They were not alone in the bedroom. She knew, in spite of the 
mist that came and went, that some indistinct thing was not far 
from them, and was drawing toward the curtain. It was looking 
for the dresser. The dresser was behind them ! 

The pressure on her am, tightened. •' Steady, steady !" it warned 
her. "Soft, now, soft I" She could feel the tension of the sinewy 
frame. She closed her eyes, drawing her own strength from it. 



TO SAVE A STAINLESS NAME. 41 

They could have touched the man on the other side of the cur- 
tain j thay could hear him breathe. The fabric trembled between 
them. Then the groping hand from without laid hold upon it. 

There was a motion in the figure beside her, and a loud, invol- 
untary shriek — her own I Then came a orash, Bad a blinding trail 
of fire, and another instant crash and blaze in return. The masked 
man sprang forward, the other man sprang upon him. They fired 
and fired again. One fell and dragged the other! They locked 
and railed, in a tiger-grip, upon the floor. They writhed and 
panted, in their death-embrace. There was no word, no cry. 

I Singing to the curtain over them, Margaret felt the waters rise 
again 1 Through the closing darkness she was sensible of a single 
Bound — the thudding of a club on the stones without — an officer, 
calling help. 

Help ! Help ! Hut they would ho too late for the human tigers 
»' her feel I Her hold on the curtain weakened. Shu swayed, and 
fell beside them. 

It seemed hut a moment before she came to heiself, yet she was 
oooscious thai, in some way all had changed. She stretched her 
arms — they touched soft pillows. She was lying on her bed. 

She sat up. The mom was very still. She passed her hand 
across her eyes. A strange thing had conn: with her awaking — 
she was no longer afraid 1 Creeping up, she slipped from off the 
bed, and stole out toward the alcove. One dark figure lay there, 
blotting out the moonlight, his arm thrown heavily across his face. 
The girl bent over, breathless, looking. A sudden wave of anguish 
shook her 1 Which of the two ? Was it lie who saved her? 

She knelfc beside the dead man, fiercely, and dragged away his 



There was a jam and crash, below stairs, as though a door had 
given way, a confusion of unfamiliar sounds. There wasahurried, 
shuffling noise of feet, and whispering voices. A round red light 
shot along the upper wall. But she did not heed it. She noticed 
nothing. She took the heavy head upon her lap, and pressed her 
hands against the clotted hair. So the police found her, staring 
down upon it, sitting like a stone. It was not the face she had 
feared to find 1 Tka dead manivas her brother! 



42 TO SAVE A STAINLESS NAME. 

There was a shout below, from without, and one of the officers 
who had come in rushed back, thinking it a cry for help. She did 
not bear it 1 Afterwards she knew that they had found another 
man, down where the grounds joined the road, unconscious, dying 
of his wounds — and with her jewels on hia breast. 

Margaret Ihlefield told her own story. Neither of the silent 
witnesses has gainsaid her, and the opinion of the world will not 
disturb her now. 

She alone has known what that awful night first revealed and 
later research laid bare to her; — her brother, a criminal at twenty- 
one, through bad company and secret debt, had returned to rob his 
benefactor and foster-father, and had died, red-handed, in his act. 

Who shall judge her? What was there left for her to do? 
Should she blacken his poor dead name, and drag down her family 
pride? It was easy to account for his being in town on that 111- 
I'uted day, and she did so, and said they had been together in the 
hoase. The testimony of the officers, the dead thief with the 
costly proofs upon him — these were her corroboration. To this 
hour Harry Ihlefield has been a hero, who gave up his life to de- 
fend his sister and his uncle's house, and sleeps beneath a glorious 
marble Bhaft, but Margaret was never able to look upon it 1 

After all, the other man has had bis reward .' Fainting on that 
night, and waking to find herself upon her bed, she knew that, 
wounded to death, he bad carried her to that place of safety, his 
life-blood staining her garments, and his features, as she saw them 
beneath his mask, always lingered in her memory — the clean- 
shaven face, with its thin lips and inscrutable eyes I 

You may see bis picture, too, if you care to step into the Rogues' 
Gallery. It is there, in a central place — the portrait of one of 
the most notorious criminals who ever baffled the police I 




ADVERTISEMENTS. 



43 



-, 










«| have used Fairy Soap and like it very much as a toilet 
soap. Its purity renders it exceptionally good for wash.n S 
fine fabrics." 

I... _ ^ Mrs. Chas. D. Sigsbee. 

f^ I* n O Wife of Copt. Sigsbee, U. S. N. 

Fairbanks Fairy Calendar 

in s.ze, on heavy P\*'f sto ^ y uthogrtphed in colors and tied 
(oneon eachshKtJeleganUj nu gr ^ herewithi are ong . 

-''Tnlr/ale^aTi^ua! to those "^jffi*^ to 
$..oo in the art and g^^EfM™ Soap Wrappers! or 
any address on receipt ot nve m r ~*X J™^ m ,jL 
io/in stamps to cover expense of wrapping and mailing. 
Address Dept. A.I. The N.K. Fairbank Company. Ch.cago, III. 



**£#■* 




coprfl/GW /ess. 

r/tC » K WtA/IK COMPAHY. 







ADVERTISEMENTS. 



XV 



What Ails Your Hair ? 



j Upon receipt of 10 cents in silver or stamps and this blank filled out, and enclosing a 
small sample of your hair (4 to 6 hairs) extracted by the roots, we will send you a FREE 
BOTTLE of Cranitonic Hair Food by mail prepaid and a FREE REPORT upon the condition, 
of your hair after scientific microscopical examination by our Bacteriologists. 

Kamc • 

City or Town &"& 

Sex Age 



Married or Single 

Have you Dandruff Is it Greasy or Scaly f . 

Is your hair falling out t losing color 1 

How often do you wash it? 

Does your icalp itcht Any odort 

Any scaly eruptions t 



Had any serious sickness lately f 

What it the state of your general health t , 



« »*«« 



Atf 



O Hair needs food to 

T keep it alive. 

The food should be 
supplied by the 
blood vessels of the 
scalp -which run up 
to the hair roots. 
If the roots have 
-•A been weakened by 

)*lil i the attack3 °* tlie 

scalp microbe, your 
hair falls iick, falls 
out, turns gray. 

A sure sign of "hair 
disease " is dandruff. 
If dandruff is al- 
lowed to remain it 
smothers the growth 
of your hair. 

Heretofore the 
treatment of diseases 
of the Hair and Scalp 
has been a matter of 
guess-work, without 
regard to the cause. 
In the laboratories 
of the Cranitonic 
Hair Food Co., of 
New York, the only 
institute in America 
devoted to diseases 
of the hair and scalp, 
the cause of the dis- 
ease is learned by 
MICROBE* HAVB means of a Micro- 
J ^l T ^ KW epical Examina- 
A-TheHatr. tion and a cure ef- 

SH' toted by exact and 

D— rood Gland, scientific methods. 



From an examination of 1,000 different 
samples of human hair no fewer than 
24 different diseases of the hair and scalp 
were identified; many of them contagious 
and dangerous in the extreme. 




THE DANDRUFF MICROBE 

which causes Dandruff, followed by Falling Hall 

and Finally Baldness. 

Trom Photo-Micrograph by Dr. Fahrlg. 

{Copyright 1S9».> 

FREE HAIR FOOD. 

The advantages of these researches are 
offered free to all our readers, as the 
above Question Blank shows. 

If you wish to be cured of dandruff, to 
save your hair and grow more, write to 

CRANITONIC HAIR FOOD CO., 

526 West Broadway, New York, 

and you will get a. free bottle of Cranitonic 
Hair Food, by mail prepaid, with full direc- 
tions for use, and a free report on the con- 
dition of your hair and scalp. 



XVI 



ADVERTISEMENTS . 



A Handsome Year-book 

filled with beautiful illustrations, and a com- 
plete calendar. It 



BAYERS I 

2oi2 Century Almanac 




Hera are a few of the great men 



is sold on all news- 
stands for 5 cents, 
and it's worth five 
times that amount. 
It is a reliable 
chronology of the 
progress of the 
19th century and a 
prophecy of what 
may be expected in 
the 20th. 

who have written for it : 






Secretary Wilson on Agriculture 

Sen. Chauncey M. Depew " Politics 
Russell Sage " F j» a " c ? ., 

Thomas Edison " f ^""^ , 

Gen. Merritt " l « nd ^T 

Adml. Hichborn " Naval Warfare 



You will enjoy reading it now, and it 
will be a book of reference for you through 
the years to come . Sixty-four pages printed 
on ivory finish paper. 



If your news-dealer cannot supply you with it cut out this ad. and 
send I with three one-cent stamps and receive *» ^S^^™- 

Address, J. C. Aver Co., Lowell. Mass. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



XIX 







'4££s#&. 


NO!! 

(£■■ 




Bl don't 


^J^^^? M, 


■N Drink 


'^JP" 


Coffee 




It does not agree 


i ^JL; 


with my health. 




The crank is the 




man who per- 




sists in drink that 




fc-. slowly ruins his 




R|\ stomach and 




Bfc nerves. 




F I drink 


POST 


I T M F00D 

\J ITI COFFEE. 


Postum Cereal Co., Ltd., Battle Creek, Mich. 



^ & 4 f cM v4 J 61 Si &l &i &i £ 

5 Good Livers J 

Like f 

^ Grape=Nuts j» 

>S Hot or Cold. 
"« i 



Found at Grocers. 



WHAT THEY ARE. 



Composition of the Famous New Food* 

A wide spread interest has been cre- 
ated among good livers, as to the compo- 
sition of Grape-Nuts, the new food that 
has come into popular use of late. It has 
long been known to physicians, chemists 
and food experts, that the starchy portion 
of entire wheat flour and barley is trans- 
formed into a true and very choice sugar, 
by the act of intestinal digestion in the 
human body. This sugar is identical with, 
and is known as grape-sugar, and it is in 
condition for immediate transformation 
into blood and the necessary structure 
from which the delicate nerve centers are 
built up. 

A food expert of the Postum Cereal Co., 
Lim., Battle Creek, Mich., followed a line 
of experiments until he produced the food 
called Grape-Nuts, of which grape-sugar 
forms the principal part, and it is pro- 
duced by following out Nature's processes, 
in a mechanical way. 

The new food has a charming flavor and 
can be served instantly either cold with 
cream, or, by pouring hot milk or cream 
over it, one has a hot mush at once. 



PERFECTION 



Air Mattresses jj j H fl fl 



Pillows, Cushions, 

Etc. 



For Sportsmen : Hunting, 
Fishing, Camping, or 
Yachting. May be laid 
on ground or deck, insur- 
ing a comfortable bed, 
free from dampness. 
For Invalids : These Mat- 
tresses afford great com- 
fort to invalids and bed 
ridden patients. 
When de dated and rolled small 
can be packed in grip; weight, 
ten to eighteen pound8,aecording 
to size. Largely used by U. S. 
Government, sportsmen, and 
invalids throughout the world. 

Catalogue Free. 
Mechanical Fabric Co. 
40 Sprague St „ Pi-OYldenee, R.I. 



SIZE AND SHAPE OF CIRCt.ETTES 

'Tis a Fact 

That a pair of shoes with 
three Good Luck Horseshoe- 
shaped Perfection Circlettes 
in the heel will give from 25 
to 50 per cent additional 
wear, and the heels never 
run over. 

Send 4 cents in stamps for enough for 
a pair of shoes, or io cents for 3 dozen. 
Easily driven. 

Sanford Mfg. Co. 

Summer and High Sts., Boston, Mass. 



44 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



A Holiday Hint: 

(But for Goodness Sake 
Don1.Sn\'IToMYou!) 



Send him a box of Mandolin 
Cigars and write: "May all 
our troubles end in smoke!" 




THE WOMAN WHO SMOKES 

may be a creature of the coming century, 
but 

THE MAN WHO SMOKES 

is the man who rules the world in this 
century. 

NO CHRISTMAS GIFT 

is more acceptable to the average Father, 
Brother, Friend or Sweetheart than a box 
of Choice Cigars. Our " Mandolin " is the 
best cigar in America for the money. Box 
of 50 for $2.25; 100 for $4.50, express pre- 
paid. We have finer brands, Domestic and 
imported, costing from $5.00 to $50.00 per 
hundred and shall be pleased to submit 
list and prices to Holiday buyers and 
Everyday buyers. We control favorite 
brands, import direct, and no house any- 
where can better satisfy every taste and 
every purse. 

CHARLES B. PERKINS & CO. 
36 Kilby St., Boston, Mass. 



IF 



►T^TTtTfTTTT 




ENTERPRISE 

Meat and Food CHOPPER 

Furnishes the housekeeper the easiest, 
quickest, handiest, most economical means 
of chopping raw or cooked meats, fish, 
vegetables, and fruits. No trouble to chop 
sausage and mince meat, Hamburg steak, 
tripe, hash, suet, clams, codfish, chicken 
and lobster for salads, cocoanut, corn, etc. 
Easily and quickly cleaned ; will not break 
or get out of order. 

Sold by all hardware dealers. Price, No. 2, $1.50; No ( 4, $2.00. Our trade-mark — 
ENTERPRISE— is on every machine. Descriptive catalogue mailed free. Send 4 cents 
in stamps for the "Enterprising Housekeeper" — contains 200 choice recipes. 




fe 



THE ENTERPRISE MFG. CO. OF PA., Third and Dauphin Sts., Philadelphia. 



>•••••••••< 



XX 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



e Jones Umbrella Roof 



Put on in 
One minute. 




No Sewing 




Fits any^ 
Frame. 



COVER YOUR OWN UMBRELLA 



Til<e the measure (in inches'* of vonr old umbrella cover; count the number of 
outside ribs 1 Ttatete centre rod is steel or wood. If you cannot .set the Jones 
Umbrella " Roof - of your dealer send $1.00 to us and we wi ™ p. stp . , . 
Union Twilled Silk 25 or 26 INCH "Adjustable Roof (27 or .8 ; inch, *1.<!0 . 
29 or 30 inch, $1.50). Umbrella " Roofs " at all prices from SO cents to $8.00 
Rich according to duality. If not entirely satisfactory your money promptly re- 
f Snded?iScludfng sUrnps you have used for postage Booklet. " L mbrella Kconom 
necessary, mailed with your order, 




UNION ,£p 
T#SILK. 

AdjustableRbof 



THE JONES UMBRELLA CO , Dept. H, 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE HIGHEST GRAPES OF UMBRELLAS TO THE LARGEST STORES IN 



y," with simple instructions 
79WalkeiSt.,Newiork, N. V. 

THE WORLD. AiEVtU* Wanted. 




DR B. F. BYE'S SANITARIUM, INDIANAPOLIS, INO 

Gaucev 

Cured With Soothing: Balmy Oils. 

Cancer, Tumor, Catarrh, Piles, Fistula, 
Eczema, and all skin diseases. 

Cancer of the nose, eye, lip, ear, neck, 
breast, stomach — in lacl, all internal or 
external organs or tissues -cured without 
knife or burning plasters, but with sooth- 
ing aromatic oils- 
Cut this out and send n lot an illustrated 
book on ihe above diseases. Home treat- 
ment sent when desired. Address as 
above [Mentioning The Black Cat], 
l'ox 246. 



Muted for light or heavy work. Makes 
J,. 1, We lockstitch, h;is self threadingsnut- 
tie 30 YKAHS (II AiUXTEE Without any 
money in advance we will Knd _ to your 
home on thirty days' FREE TRIAL your 
choice of our Desk Cal.inet Hewing »"■ 
lines, as illustration, or our 3. 5 or 1 draw- 
machines, with hest solid steel attach- 
ments WE PAY FREIGHT. 
b^Buv direct and save agents' and dealers 
■ ~ profits. CATALOOUE FREE. Address 
B SHEPHERD MFC. CO.. 398 K. 33nd8t.. Chicago. 

Marshall's 
Catarrh 
Snuff 
Cures Catarrh 

For 63 years It has never been equalled tor the in- 
stant relief of Catarrh, Coin in the Head and Head- 
ache Cures Ileatness. restores lost sense of smell. 
Prioe 25 els., at all Druggists or by mail postpaid. 
F. t'. KEITH, Mir., - Cleveland, O, 




AMATEUR 



Vaudeville and Minstrel 
performers. For o .\ E 
mil 1 III I will send 
you ten original parodies 
on popular songs. Ave screamingly tunny monologues, a 
brand-new stump si»-e<-ii and hundreds ot Irish. Hutch 
Hebrew ami Black-face jokes, suitable for all kinds of 
vaudeville acts. Just the tiling for cluh and home en- 
tertainments. My work highly endorsed by Tony Pastor, 
Itogere Bros., sain Bernard and leading vaudeville stars. 
JAMES C. MADISON, 134 EAST 79TH ST., N. V. 

"WAR STAMPS- flSaTfE 

Africa Hep.. Cuba, Natal, Cape of Good Hope 
-with stamp album and large price list. Only 
10CENTS. Agents Wanted. C.E.llu«sinnn 
Stamp Company. Dept., C. St. Louis. Mo. 




IRheumatism.Neuralgid.Gour.Lumbaoo 
AND OTHEB DISEASES CAUSED BV UHIC ACID IN THE 
BLOOD positively c.oo Send for 6ooMet 
THE SWISS -AME.RICAN CO 
on wiNOSOo ont„ Aopeo. BLOC qetpOiT WICH .u .5 fl I 



THEY DRAW^EE-f; p ^dT,'- y ,i a ^ 

ROLLED CICAR 

full cigar size, box of 50 for S1.25 prepaid 
to any address. 

LUCRE'S ROLLS 

(slightly smaller) box of 100 for$1.00, prepaid. 
I H LUCKE 4 CO., Luck. Block, CINCINNATI, OHIO. DELICIOUS 

THROW AWA™W.^^««^w«»^»y ta • ,0 ^ c ^^ mU • 8 •" ,M ' lr,, * ,1 ■ TO THE END. 





ADVERTISEMENTS. 



XXI 



Mr.Vanderbilt's 
$10,000 Cook 



may possibly be able to make nice desserts with 
other gelatine som e of the time. But with Knox's 
Gelatine he or any other cook is bound to make per= 
feet desserts all of the time— It's all in the Gelatine. 



Reasons 

Why You Should 
Use Klloac'ft 
«- elai t in*- : 



1 It is endorsed 
by the most noted 
teachers of cookery 
(gee list in our little 
cook book) as " the 
Purest and Best," 
as having the "Fin 
est Flavor" and as 
" Never Failing." 

2 It has been 
awarded lO Prize 
Medals and diplo- 
mas (see list in our 
little cook book) for 
superiority over all 
other brands, and i> 
now the Standard 
Gelatine. 

3 It is simpler 
to prepare than any 
other, is more 
healthful than pas- 
try and puddings, 
and is the Only 
Guaranteed Gel- 
atine. 




3 

Things 

You Should Do II' 
You lVunt l>eli- 
riouM l>es*ei'1« : 

1 If your cook 
won't use Knox's 
Gelatine get another 
cook. The Wrong 
Cook uses the 
Wrong Gelatine. 



2 If your gro- 
cer won't sell 
Knox's Gelat i n e 
get another grocer. 
The Right Grocer 
sells the Right Gel- 
atine. 



3 If you haven't 
"Dainty Des- 
serts for Dainty 
People," send a 2- 
cent stamp for it. 
Even the biggest 
cook can 1 e a r n 
something from this 
little book. 



THE CLEANEST 



Knox's 

Gelatine 

Is sold by Grocers, or sent, postpaid, (together with a 
free copy of " Dainty Desserts for Dainty People " ) 
pint sample, 5c; two quart package, J 5c. (2 for 
25c). Pink Gelatine for fancy desserts in every 
package. CHAS. B. KNOX, 20 Knox Ave., 
Johnstown, N. Y. 

GELATINE FACTORY IX THE WOULD. 



XXII 



AUV ERTISEMENTS. 




Heavy Indian Tanned 

.MOOSE HIDE MOCCASINS. 

Men's, Boys', Women's, Misses' and Children's Sizes. 

The Moccasin has stood the test of ages by that race of hunters. 

the American Indians, who were the originators of the camp, 
the trap, the snow shoe and the canoe. Send for our 
free catalogue of Moccasins, and also 

The Putman Boots, for 

HUNTERS, 
EXPLORERS, 

AND 

ENGINEERS, 

Pulma. Bool« ar.- Waterproof and Made to Jleasore. 

H. J. PUTMAN & CO., 

Bridge Square and First St. , 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 

.,„! f„ron l,-r >'':»">' showing liow to measu r.- unu toot. 

U „„„ iu. Qi.u T, c * unmistakable in genuine tropical -grown tobacco. 

HaVe ThG nICn I aSie ftHagatlur superior to uncllmatic domestic stock 



Us 



ROLLED CICAR 

[ fall cigar size, box o f 50 f or $1.25 prepaid 
to any address. 

LUCRE'S ROLLS 

' (slightly smaller) box of 100 for $1.00, prepaid. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 



... r-1-.r.n -rn I H LUCKE & CO., Lucke Block, 
THROW awaT Wegn.lt'eflavorco.ualto.^importcae.EW.oldmU.S.ormouty hack. TO THE END. 





The 

"Old Reliable Parker" 



An old, mellow, Rye Whiskey 



Case 4 bottles, S5.00 

" 6 " 7.25 

u 12 " 14.00 

Delivered by Express in plain cases, 
prepaid. 




ALWAYS IN EVIDENCE. 

At the Chamberlain Cartridge & Target 
Co.'s Tournament, held at Cleveland. Ohio, 
June 14th and 15th, 1899, it won First and 
Second High Average in the AMATEUR 
class and First High Average in the EX- 
PERT class, with scores as follow: 97.88 
per cent, in AMATEUR class and 90.4 per 
cent, in EXPERT class. 

Fred Gilbert, with a Parker Gun, at 
Sioux City, Iowa, June 6th, 7th, 8th and 9th, 
shooting at 910 targets scored 97.3 per cent. 

These Records show that the PARKER 
GUN lor close, hard shooting, and ability 
to perform continuous hard work is ex- 
celled by none. 

Send for catalogue to 

Parker Brothers, Meriden, Conn. 

New York Salesroom, 96 Chambers St. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



XX111 



bbfafe t 4fe^^^**jfe*^**^^***MMMMMMM**MiM*M*****« 



^HERBERT SPENCER 



I ENGLAND'S 
GREATEST 
THINKER. 




AMERICA'S 
GREATEST 
GIGAR. 



Herbert Spencer 

A BETTER 10c. CIGAR THAN YOU 
EVER OBTAINED BEFORE. 

The mediocre quality of most Cigars retailing at this price has 
induced us to put on the market THE HERBERT SPENCER - 
a Cigar that in size, quality of tobacco and workmanship is superior 
to any for the money. 



r 



In order to introduce the HERBERT SPENCER 
Cigar quickly among a class of smokers who will 
appreciate its superiority, we will send by mail 
a box of 12, Conchas Especiales size, on receipt of 



$1.00 




We believe that after trying the HERBERT SPENCER Cigar you will .nsist 
upon your dealer supplying you. If he hesitates, order from us. This special 
offer is only made for the purpose of introduction and deserves the ,mmediate 
EtStion of every smoker who wants a high-grade article that is in every respect 
equal to most cigars for which more money is asked. 

Price List to tbe Trade Sent on Application. 

The Hew England News Company, The American News Company, 

BOSTON. NEW YORK - 



XXIV 



ADVEKTISEMKNTS. 



DO NOT SENDUSANYMONEY 




LOOK 

thin? just as we advertise 
lar'tro handsome ~* 

pattern a prize-:" 
yiu [he bracelet 
refer to the puhl 
sell at sight and 



YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO MISS THIS GRAND OFFER. 
A Masniiicont Solid <io!d-Plated Initial Bracelet or Blnp 
our Rings are all set with a carefully selected Ruby or Emerald Stone, 
mounted in a Tiffany setting. The Bracelets are in the latest style, popu- 
lar Curb Link; the lock and key being exquisitely engraved, iney pre- 
sent a beautiful appearance and will wear a lifetime. Over ioo.oco young 
ladies are now wearing our rines and bracelets. We guarantee every- 
Just send os* your name and addross (letter or postal), that sail 



FREE 

We will send yon lO 




A Free Trip to Paris! 



Persons of mechanical or inventivemlnddesmngafree 
trip to The Paris Exposition with salary, should write 
The- PATENT lECURl), Baltimore, Md. 

^reeTfreeT 

Any nne ran earn this Beautiful 
(;..ll Plated Hunting Case Stem 
Winder Walsh, Charm and Chain, 

(Buarinteed' a perfect timekeeper, 
by Belli tit! niir Inraadrscent ..amp 
UieL*. They ran be boM In a few 
hours. An 1 practically indeatrur tiMe 
Bo trimming, no smoke, m> srm-11. 

OUR GRAND 90-DAY OFFER: 

Bend ynur name and address, ana 

we send you 20 wicks, postpaid ; 

sell them at 5c each and remit us 

$1, and we will mail to you free a 

BPirTTFTT OOI.n PLATED HATCH CHAM AM» OUR*. 

mCAKo"sCEnT WIM CO., DEPT.B.C. BRIDGEPORT, MM. 



PARALYSIS 




Locomotor Ataxia conquered 
at last. Doctors puzzled, Pro- 
fessors amazed at the return 
to health of patients thought to be incurable, by 
DR.CHASK'S IIMHH) AND NERVE FOOD. 
Write me about your case. Will send proof of cures 
with advice free. l>r. Cha*e, 224 N. I Oth BL, rbila.. Pa. 

COMBINATION OFFER 





ANY ONE CAN EASILY EARN » WATCH-CHAIN 
AND CHARM-LADIES' OR, GENTS' STYLE- 
GOLO PLATEO, NICKEL OR, SILVER WATCH, 
mm a big d,„k called a watch . CHAIN BRACE- 
LET with lock and key, 50 PIECE TEA, SET '"" 
size for family use , GOLD FINISHED INITIAL 
RING Wc mean every word we Bay. To quickly introduce our 
bouse and goods we will give away thousands of the above pres- 
ents ABSOLUTELY FREE. Sand ub your name and address lao 
mone". ."a we will "ail you, postpaid 15 beautiful stamped 
DOILIES, different deeiens. with 15 exquisitely perfumed love 
charms. Sell the Doilies at 10c. each and give one charm free 
with each. When sold send U8 the ,1.50 and we will at once send 
you for Belling 15, one Watch-Chain and Charm and a Ring with 
any letter vou wish, together with our offer of a 66 piece Tea Pet. 

etc. PARIS ART CO.,B.C.M0NTCLAIR, NEW JERSEY. 




Anyone can easily earn a 

Watch Chain and Charm— 

I ladies' or gents' style-cold 

i plated nickel or Silver TV atch 

(nut a clock called a watch), gold 
finished pearl Initial Pin & a 
5G-Piece Tea Set lull Bize. tor 
family ubb. This Tea Set ia beautifully decorated and 
most artistic desitrn. A rare chance You can get this 
handsome TEA SET, A COLD WATCH CHAIN 4 CHARM 
with PEARL INITIAL PIN for selling our Bluing and Ink 
Powder. We mean what we say and will give tins beau- 
tiful Tea Set, Watch, etc., ABSOLUTELY FREE it you 
will comply with the extraordinary offer we send to 
every person talcing advantage of this advertise- 
ment To quickly introduce our Bluing and Ink Powder, 
if you agree to sell only 15 packages at 10c a package, 
writ, to-day (SEND NO MONEY) and we will forward 
th. goods prepaid, when sold SEND OS the $160 
and w. send you for selling the 15, one Vvatch 
Chain 4 Charm 4 a Pearl Initial Pin with any letter you 
3ish together with our offer of a 56-piece china Tea bet 
sam. day money is received. This is a liberal induce- 
ment to every one In the land and all who receive th. 
Tea Set, Watch, etc., are delighted. 

Chemical Specialty Co., Dept. b. c. 

40 West 22d St., New York; City. 







ADVERTISEMENTS. 



XXV 



^_~» ^^._.i„ £„..a«-a hunker F 




For only $5.00 

1 o„" w . £«£*«, inr srsssss ^r^c*. 

«„„A»T«D TO V^SrV.^.S-r,^^--. „„ RE CONViMi , NT , 

FOR IT Ready for use when received. No frame to set up. 
No trouble ; no bother. 

IT IS THE ONLY GENUINE CABINET HADE. 

n <,t do this "Vr'Y,?J> farml^ndbod'donotwochtb* 

el and cool the body wnjjf.i" 8 '"*^ together and damage 
-S»! 3£tf«K-3~3-» iS g pound s . K^SSS 
~E"n^aveTfrom "photograph. D A ™ CABINETS FOR YEARS. 27.000 physicmns and 1.000 ; 

„0^u^^^^ 

eB^aWSW£*5SEi or Child in the World 

There is no Man, Woman or Benefit. 

Whom Turkish and * ^ t £^ v Bat u «m$ vnK>v.^r*n* 

Rooms, Sanitariums ami Hoi Springs. 

SO SIMPLE TO OPERATE. 

Before retiring, Ught stove ^pggS&ftS? i'V^'l' 
door, sit down ami you « >' 1 .'' v" Vll .Kme in one 
according to how y» ll , u f, ,,' ,ui. « "open top rurtains. cool 

harmle98 - don-t be deceived 

by imitations. We do not make ■'^SEwr'"! iinreiu 
with other people' sgo. ». 'u ■ sth " ; »' in , nP past 

able, irresponsible '•" /^ ' e vei ..the laws ot hygiene. 
few months, know i.' u g , ,£!;,. a ,h. aiv living!" marke 
and have no regard '"^ i, 1 ,r . m.'inv.iiieiil. unreliable and 
so-called Cabinets, win h ■ ' " s .„ ,„,■,„.„„„ given, and 

dangerous to use . on th est re run a 'i ,,,.„„„„. Quaker, and 
the enormous demand e'M < Uor « u g , ( , ,„ i , u ,,, t „,„.„ 

as we have many h't cist ro n 1 < ■ * ,, ,,, au> ,hrowthein*w»J 
goods, are unable tonaethe in. U » ■ b f , „ our <lnt y to 
and secure a genuine »' ' 'g, ,V be tmpOBed upon. 

lining. K .;■■■•■'» •' ' S \V,| 1 ■" an.l abort a» ml— 

IMuce vour iiriler wii '• "SJtSlhmdiiMa with a resnon- 
i.toctiou "f knowing you are ta ggM ;i ^ < knoW „„. 
"ble and reliable nrm cabilal i MO. , k / t , xa ,.,, y „ the, 
S^SSSA^VSS^SSW, guaranteed to be 

„Me book, also test".... niahv .".nth. '^^ ^ ,,,.,,.„.,,, ,- 
Or, better still, order a C. » " . ' .„„, ,.,.,„„,! ,,, , 



... HEALTH. 
PKkVV.M's Col«., Fewr., l-asrippe and 

..TiKs .M,.n.y -'-;::■;, xsris 

pure blood, »lr..nic IBWi « > 

,'."« vou „leep —1. ». =...«««c. complex- 

"VI; v,. am. NVATK. SftjBJKgsaP BKrSMfc 

while Vapor baths "i"-'"' > ; '•'„..;,,,„ ^ ,„,, all i he poisons in 
stimulating the sw. -a t g ai s ■"^■' 'J- ,,„.., „|,i,h it retained 
,hebl,,o,l.andlh.-iin. •• !-■- |: ^ ln , s .,, v ,.,,,,,,ising 
overwork and weaken tbenear^aMuwj , 

lii*',*., debility ami sh.gg.sh.iess. orclllT _ 

UVE POSITIVELY GUARANTEE RESULTS, 
wt roai ' » w »* ,..",,., i„.*t Dhvslclans, and 

,„„ Cabinet ^^E^^L^T^ l.ebi.ity, 

it « ill <».<• > .*'*"i." La-iippc, Xeiiialuia. 

M.epl.""'-.. «»■ « - <>■ .'■•*- J • offered 

OVKH Kll 1.1 MA '•*",.„ V, \,rV....m» tor 
(tar four ] •■:•>•* ■ -i : .' < ,,r, . WotaMi'a Trouble}, 



and Kidney 



HEA STEAMn« ATTACHUD X 

!SS„^:p=H i !H:.^"";nn!!twi,hregn,a r 
We furnish a perfect a 1 ■ "h"l Jt.n t < I TWs M the 

i^^'affsiov^^t'.m^U;;.'.,, I,v, another, Safe. 

"^o^hdentS^ that our Cabinet will Dleaae you that 

WE SEND IT ON 30 DAYS 1 TRIAL 

.< ....■■ nMsaie ""<• your 

to be .eturncl '> t „*;; just.'"." rep. ..cited. 
.....icy re|-ui.«l"-«l ■' , "ot ,:;",",,,,! aCtord to have a 
What could M more fa . .' W e ' '.'^ '.,'„.',, ( „ s; ,l. S laclory. 
iMianei "^ w '\ i ;;;V»^' J r h? . ! ■ i^ wonderfully low. 
«:^ , ^or , "".^,;,i"!^.' .-">"».« a'«*SL*SE' 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



XXVH 



fffiE^ARVEX QLOVD. 

(Registered.) 

IN THE NEW SHADES FOR 
AUTUMN. 

Manufactured exclusively for 

i. pitman *» Co. 

New York. 




IS THE BEST 

BECAUSE ITS PURITY 
IS ABSOLUTE , ITS FLAVOR 
UNIQUE . MADE IN 

-.NICE.FRANCE. * 











WATCH AND CHAIN FOR ONE DAY'S WORK. 




Boys and Girls can get a Mckel-Plated 

\ Watch, also a Chain and Charm for se.hng 

) lVdoz. YaekaBes of Hluine at 10 cents each. 

' fiend your full address by return mail and 

we will forward the Blinne, post-paid, and 

a large Premium List. No money required. 

BliUINK CO. Concord Junction, Mass. 



CHlLDrWl 



'TEETHING 



For Children While Cutting: Their Teeth. 



An Old and Well-Tried Remedy. 

FOR OVER FIFTY YEARS 
MRS. WINSLOW'S SOOTHING SYRUP 

has been used for over Fifty Years by 
Millions of Mothers for their Children 
while Teething, with Perfect Success. 
It Soothes the Child, Softens the Gums, 
Allays all Pain; Cures Wind Colic, and 
is the best remedy for Diarrhce a. Sold by 
Druggists in every part of the world. Be sure 
and ask for Mrs. Winslow's Soothing 
Syrup and take no other kind. 

Twenty-f lv« Cent* a Bottle. 



TRY IT WITH YOUR 

SALADS \f* 



Don't Spoil Your Salad 

By Using Poor Oil. 

A large proportion of the oil sold as olive 
oil is really made from cotton and similar 
seeds drug extracts, etc. Such oils are 
poor in flavor and often positively injurious 
as a food product. Pure olive oil is dis- 
tinctly nutritious. 

The best oil should be none too good for 
your salads. Micelle Olive Oil contains 
nothing but the highly refined extract of 
" sound " and wholesome olives. It retains 
the original flavor of the olive better than 
any other brand. A simple trial will prove 
these statements. 

" COMPARISON is the TEST ot 
SUPERIORITY." 




THE FINEST 

AMERICAN 

CHAMPAGNE 

Grand 
Imperial 

Sec 

has no equal for 
PURITY AND EX- 
CELLENCE, and 
is used in many 
of the best HO- 
TELS, HOMES 
AND CLUBS in 
preference to for- 
eign vintages. 
A trial case will 
convince you 
For sale and recom- 
mended by all leading 
grocers and wine 
merchants every- 
where. . . . 
Write for )>ooklet 
and special price-list 
of assorted cases. 

Germania 




■)fii7$f/f/ ///'/// til* 




xxvi 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



'SHAVING 
I SOAP 




"IT WON'T DRY ON THE FACE." 

Most shaving soaps dry quickly on the face— and this produces the smarting 
and irritation so annoying and dangerous. 

You can apply the Rich, Cream-like lather of Williams' Soap, sit down and 
read your morning paper, and still find the lather almost as moist and thick as 
when first applied. Your beard will be thoroughly softened, and you will enjoy 
a most soothing, comforting, refreshing shave. This remarkable quality of 
WILLIAMS' SHAVING SOAP is found in no other, and has made it famous 
from pole to pole. 

Williams' Shaving Soips are used by all first-class barbers, and «re sold everywhere. 
By mail it your dealer does not supply you. 
WILLIAHS- SHAVING STICK, »5 ct». LUXURY SHAVINO TABLET, * S ctB. 

GENUINE YANKEE SHAV^MAP^. «U. ^ TAR s0Ap 

WILLIAMS' SHAVING fOAP.^Barbe™'). ^^.nV l^° ** " 



Depots: 



THE J. B. WILLIAMS CO., Glastonbury, Conn. 
London, P»rl». Dresden, 



Sydney. 






AlJVKKXISK.MKXTS. 



XXIX 



i unmMMi ii ii i i"' "" ""' ■■■*■■■—■ 

kOTS of MAILandSAMPLES FREE* 



Put your name and addressin our Reliable 
United States Agents Directory which goes to 
thousands of firms who will gladly mail you 
free samples of Agents Goods of every des- 
cription including Medicines, Books. Pictures, 
Novelties. Magazines, Cards, Household Artic- 
les, Wholesale Catalogues, etc., etc. 

Ton will receive bushels of valuable sam- 
ples. We must have 80.00O new names at 
once for our Agents Directory and in order to y 
secure them quickly we will scud you by > 
return mail free of charge all , of the tol-\ 
lowing very valuable merchandise : Six ' 
separate books printed on nice paper and 
neatly bound. Each volume is complete by \ 
itself. The titles of these highly 1 uteres mg 
books are as follows: 1 How to get Rich, , 
a How to Hypnotize. 3 Artof L veMa k 
Ing, 4 Guide to Fortune Tilling anil , 
llrVam Book, 5 Mack Art or Magic Made | 
Easy, 6 Mormonism Exposed, i 

We also send you 7 Parlor Games 4 Agents I 
Articles (retail value, 50 cents each) 22 Por- , 
traits of U. S. Presidents, 25 Portraits of Far, 
mous Stage Beauties, 1 Coin Value Guide, I , 
I-Ved Stamp Value Guide showing prices paid 
for cancelled U. S Postage Stamps and names 
of firmsthatbuy them. 10 Latest Comic Songs, 
1 Complete Map of the U. S. and abeautifully 
illuTated New York Story Paper for 3 months 
We also send you our own Mammoth Ijovctj 
Catalogue of 2000 Bargains, and a . $1.00 due bill 
which will actually entitle you toM.OO worth 
of merchandise free. Understand this is no 
fake and the due bill entitles you to $1.00 
worth of goods free, whether you buy any- 
thing or not. Send your name to-day and en- 
closed cents to help pay postage and packing. 
__ Address plainly, 

* UNITED STATES AGENTS DIRECTORY CO., Dept. 37 STATION S. NEW YORK CITY. 

h ii I h ■■■mmi ■ ■ ■ mmmimmimmM!!! 

NOT A PENNY 
BEFORE YOU SEE IT. 

14-karat. gold filled, double hunt- 
ing case Watch, with your Jlono- 
grani engraved.Amerlcan stem 
wind and set. Full Jewelled. 

' SENTC.O.D. FOR $8.97, 

1 with privilege of examina- 
tion before paying; if not 
satisfied, order express 
agent to return it. Gi»e 
c, .rrect add ress. nearest ex- 
press office, also initials; 
mention ladies' or gents' size. 

Addre,. EAGLE WATCH CO., 

Ucpl. P 01! Maiden Lane, New Vork. 




ASTHMA 

~^~ ^^If you suffer from any form of 
FREE. Asthma we want to send you free 
In- maiT, prepaid, a Bottle of the famous Kola 
Plant Compound. It is Nature's Sure Bo- 
taSlc Cure for the disease, and we guarantee that 
it "m forever stop all your sutler ng We are 
sending out50,000 Bottles free by mail to Sufferers, 
to prove the wonderful power of this New Dis- 
covery! and we will be pleVsed to send one to you. 
Sena your name and address on postal card. 
be Addres U s' The KOI.A I«rOBT«J« «> 
No. 1184 Broadway. new *orjt. 

STOPPED TTF KOSES 

from whatever cause are opened at on^JTSSSg 
\ii'\i'iioKiA. Sample sent free. sjBnaflorew 
,,,, i ,'mi'i. MENTHOBIA will relieve and am bo h 
,,,( i,, i ,. head and catarrh. One trial wUl prove tWa. 
• n \i" w v '. « . to ■ ■"'! von • fieesampto. Regular 

ffi 5l Vents Frederick feiuedy Co., 12 Grove St., 
Taunton, Mass. 




5000 ZOUZAN MAGIC CHARMS FREE! 

rr"".," r. % n ,i Oaat Jalay. Enclose money order 
s..t our I'c.i.ular New SiiniraandfreeeWJ 
,1 hat r 

11IIBW1UK1J law — " — mm~ , , f 

these woiiileriiil eharm. S 



iSsSSeS t. 'e ■" '" Jeweled bj*gj««g $&$ 

* wonderful cl.!ii*i«»». Milenaicl i lUts onen-ii 

tor dab, "among your friend* we do a cash business 



ICcr C-lllCCS IlCUUMK JV". »».~. . - - 

only and treat our customers right. 

J Kandall I'nb . Co.. Mtntioa A, Bo»t.i 

n.^- dV.«. I naf a choice growth heretofore monopolized by Spanish 
rOnO tltC3n LBal'exporters. A pleasing astonishmen t to Americ ans. 

ROLLED CICAR ' 

full cigar size, box of 50 for $1.25 prepaid 
to any address. 

LUCKE'S ROLLS 

*& (slightly smaller) box of 100 for $1.00, prepaid. 
H LUCKE & CO Lucke Block, CINCINNATI, OHIO. DELICIOUS 

THROW ^^W.J^u}!^^^^,^^^^^'^^^^"^ 





xxvm 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




Inebriety-A Disease. 

Inebriety, Morphine, and other Drug habits are j 
dependent upon a diseased condition of the nervous ) 
system. < 

The victim of the disease again and again puts ' 
forth the most heroic efforts to reform, but his dis- < 
ease is too absolutely overpowering to be conquered ( 
by resolutions. The will power he would exercise ( 
if he could is no longer supreme. Alcoholic stim- ) 
ulants have so congested the delicate nerve cells) 
that they cannot respond to the performance of ' 
their functional duties, and the helplessness of the i 
victim's condition is as inexplicable to himself as 1 ' 
seems inexcusable to his friends. 

The Keeley treatment cures this disease by re- ) 
storing the nerves to a perfectly healthy state. It ) 
cures by removing; the came. The result J 
is that the patient is left in a normal and healthy' 
condition, and he has neither craving, desire, nor i 
necessity for stimulants. t 

Over 300.000 men and women to-day have been ( 
permanently cured of the disease of inebriety ( 
through Dr. Keeley's treatment, which is adminis- ) 
tered only at institutions authorized by him. 

The treatment at these institutions is pleasant ; ' 
no restraint is imposed; it is like taking a four-' 
weeks' vacation ; thepatientonlyknows he is cured 
Detailed information of this treatment, and proofs of its success, sent free upon applica- 
tion to any of the following institutions : 




Alcohol, 
Opium, 
Tobacco 
Using /fr 



) Address THE KEELEY 
INSTITUTE at either 
' Hot Bprings, Ark. 
' S:tn Francisco, < ';il.. 
1170 .Market St. 
)\Vest Haven, Conn. 
^Washington, D. <'., 
5 211 North CapltOt Si 



Dwight, 111. 
Marlon. Ind., 

1908 So. Adams Si 
Crab ' nvhanl. K y. 
New < Orleans, La., 

1628-38 Felicity St. 
Portland. Me., 

161 1 longressSt, 
Lexington, Haas. 



Benton Harb'r.Mich., 

179 Pipestone St. 
Minneapolis, Minn., 

Cor. 10th St.it Park 

Ave. 
St. Loots, Mo., 

2808 Locust St. 
S"orth Conway. N ll 
Newark. N..I., 

GO East Park St. 




Buffalo, N. V.. 
868 Niagara St 

White Plains. N. V. 
tlreenshoro. N. ('. 

Columbus, < ihlo, 

90 North Fourth St. 

Philadelphia, Pa., 

812North Kroad St. 
Pittsburg. Pa., 
42« Fifth Ave. 



Providence, K. i. 
Richmond, Va., 
1012 K. Marshall St. 

Waukesha, "Wis. 



^9»»99SM*mM9^0O*99tK> i »»99 9 999999099 9 99 SSSS3*SSSS3S&a 



a 

I 
I 



GUIDE TO STRENGTH. 




The 30th edition (revised) of my little book. "Three 
(.'lasses of Men," is now ready, and will be mailed in 
plain, sealed envelope to any pari ol the world, free of 
charge. Over five million copies ol this treatise have 
been distributed since the Brat edition appeared some 
years ago, marking, l believe, the largest circulation of 
any therapeutic work ever published. This little hook 
was compiled by me to embody the provcnresultsot my 
80 years' experience as a specialist. 



(ft 

1 
] 

%si« 



DR. B. A. SANDEN, 



(ft 

* 

I 



much valuable advice and outlining a course to pursue 
tor the greatest possible development of manhood both 
physical and mental. It tells that strength once dissi- 
pated may be regained by nature's treatment 

WITHOUT DRUGS. 

It tells of my success in the proper employment of the 
galvanic current of electricity and how I discovered SSI 
years ago that an appliance was required which would 
give a continuous, mild current for seven or eight hours 
at a time. This led me to construct a portable chain 
battery which the patient might apply himself, and 
standi me m on a line of experiment that has developed 
by decrees, by jr. years of close practical study and appli- 
cation into the construction of my present 

DR. SANDEN ELECTRIC BELT, 

protected by patents. This I consider a perfect home 
scit-i [cat merit. The book descril»es it thoroughly. You 
wear it around your waist comfortably at night. It 
cures while you sleep, sending a pleasant, soothing 
stream of electricity through the weakened parts, curing 
in 60 to 80 days, often benefiting at once. Do not forget 
that this belt is used by women as well as men forthetreatment of Rheumatism in any part of the body. 
Lumbago, Kidnev, Liver Disorders, etc., and in fact will cure aches, pains and weaknesses of any sort. I 
give my personal attention to correspondents, and offer free advice at my office or by mail. My system of 
8vmptoms blanks enables me to diagnose cases perfectly at any distance, though to those who live nearby 
any of my offices a personal call will enable them to see the Belt in working order and test current. I have 
able and experienced assistants at my various branches, over 6000 unsolicited testimonials received during 
Write or call to-day. 

826 broadway, new york, n. y. 
183 so clark st., chicago, ill. 
133 Tremont St., boston, Mass. 
924- chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa 

■:$$:$$$:$$:$! $i$^$i$t$s^€ €€€€•€€€€€€€€€ 



€€€€ €€€r$f $3 



XXX 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



I CURE PARALYSIS 

Nervo-Vital Reflex Nervous and Associate Pelvic Diseases. 




Under the latter 
category are includ- 
ed True Rupture, or 
Breach, False Rup- 
ture or Varicocele, 
Prostatic and all dis- 
eases which interfere 
with nature's normal 
processes. 

These diseases im- 
pede the circulation, 
impair nutrition, in- 
duce grave nervous 
and mental weak- 
nesses varying in de- 
gree from slight ner- 
vous debility to com- i». «. m« n \ 
plete Paralysis. Varicocele (or 
Varix) is a relaxed condition of 
veins in which the blood becom- 
ing stagnant and clotted, impedes 
and poisons the circulation. 

The toxic clots are carried into 
the general circulation, causing 
Paralysis in some form. If de- 
posited in the arteries which sup- 
ply the brain, Paresis, Hemiple- 
gia and other incapacitating dis- 
eases result. Locomotor-Ataxia, 
Paraplegia, Monoplegia, etc., are 
caused by deposits that affect the 
spinal cord. 

One male in ten has Varicocele ; 




this is the reason more men than 
women are paralyzed. 

By my Electro-Chemic system 

DELMER D. RICHARDSON, M. D., 



and its Electro-Pneu- 
matic adjunct I cure 
Rupture in from two 
to three weeks and 
every case of Vari- 
cocele in five days. 
I cure seemingly 
hopeless cases of Pa- 
ralysis. By delicate 
mechanisms of my 
own designing, I car- 
ry and diffuse pow- 
erful natural cura- 
tives to the remote 
nerve cells, which, by 
active chemical affin- 
kiihov, m. i>. ities, remove organic 
poisons, disorganize these depos- 
its, restoring nerve currents and 
vital power. The curative effects 
of my treatment are immediate. 

Ataxia -pains are instantaneously and 
permanently relieved. 

I accomplish the cure of these 
diseases without internal reme- 
dies, leaving the alimentary canal 
undisturbed, that it may assimi- 
late the nerve food and liberal hy- 
gienic diet with which I provide 
my patients. I cure to stay cured. 
I have no remediesorappliances 
to ship. My personal professional 
services and the administering of 
my Electro-Chemic treatment by 
myself is required to accomplish 
a cure of diseases to which T 
limit my practice. 

The Richardson Home which I maintain for the 
accommodation of patients is equipped with every 
modern convenience and adjunct for the care of those 
under my charge and for their comfort. 

A prompt response will reach those who write a 
full history of their case. Enclose ten cents to pre- 
pay postage on sealed book which I have written and 
illustrated from photographs of cases covering every 
condition of the foregoing diseases. 

Upon request for information, please write name 
and address plainly. 

1266-74 Michigan Ave., Chicago. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



XXXI 



A MYSTERIOUS FORGE. 

Prof. Weltmer of Nevada, Mo., Origi- 
nates a riethod of Hagnetic Healing 
That Proves All Diseases Can be 
Cured. 

Life is lint .1 germ made to emerge troiii a >">*''•' j'.'"-; 
obscurity -y an All Wise God, u«g>glgf Hm, 

i space before He sends 
it to a realm ot Im- 
mortality. Tlnsshort 
space was not meant 
tone filled with aches 
ami pains. It is now 





Uscovered thai dis- 
ease is unnatural and 
is directly caused by 
humanity and can he 
cured by human 
hands. This wonder- 
fuldiscovery has been 
made by Prof. B. A. 
Well in. t. of Nevada. 
Mo., who originated 
the inetliod of Mag- 
netic Healing known 
as w -Minerisin. By 
this method he lias 
already cured over 
nii.n«i"afrllctedof ev- 
ery imaginable dis- 
gaw. That great 

method known as the 
Uisent Treatnient 
cm-es all classes of 
people, "O matter at 
what distance they 
PROF. WELTMEK. live or the nature of 

£ww l,i* riii "( the womb, heart and stora- 

t , ■ , i, ,s in liae than 80 days she was cured bythe 

VlU \ ietT.o, In ike manner thousands Have Wn 

Al.sc it .«< no. i. in ■ » Weltmer. Nevada. Mo.. 

, in re e.ve f ve the Magnetic Journal, a 40-page 
mag^ana tong list of mist remarkable cues ever 
performed. 

TEACHES HIS METHOD TO OTHERS. 

The American 
School ot Magnetic 
Healing is organized 
under the laws of 
the .'Stale of Miss- 
ouri, l'rof. Welt- 
met is the president 
ot tins institution. 
and Prof. J. H. 
Kelly, the secretary 

and treasurer. It is 

impossible for Prof. 
Weltmer to attend 

to the enormous de- 
mands made upon 
him to cure. He, 
therefore, wishes 
others to take up 
his profession sothat 
he may call upon 
them to assist linn 
in his noble work. 

With this in view 

the American 

School of Magnetic 

Healing was found- 
ed. The method 

!;s:."T,v ll this ! " 8 cho"l PKOF. KEI.LY,' Secy, and Treas. 

Its^e^ls'ticli'^'slnilcntsl, ,,e aaem.-i,,.. as Prof. 

: . , ,\, t : , ■ v.'i ' "ilic great numberwho have been 

&e&aJUWAg£ra 

Magnetic Healing are earning I torn slot H er nav 

Hv addressing Prof. J. H. Kelly, sec \. Nevada, .no. 
you w.n receive full instructions free ot charge. 



DO YOU KNOW 

That persons with some 
money, or who can save 
a little from their income 
or wages, will be given, practically 
FREE, a PLANTATION of 
from Five to Forty Acres? 

THE CUBAN LAND AND STEAMSHIP CO. 

Incorporated with a capital of $1,000,000, and 
composed of some of the best-known men of 
New York, is now forming an American 
Colony In Cuba. You can take advan- 
tage of this capital and knowledge to acquire 

a future home. Over five thousand 
thrifty people have already joined 

our colony. The Company will plant and 
cultivate your plantation for five years for 
five dollars per acre per year. A five-acre 
plantation cultivated is worth $5,000 
end of five years ; a forty-acre plantation is 

worth $40,000. Send for beauti- 
ful illustrated Book and Maps ot 
Cuba and our property, and tobacco, 

sugar, orange, lemon, banana, pineapple and 
vegetable culture. Excursion! will be run 
monthly to property. Address 

CUBAN LAND & STEAMSHIP CO. 

32 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 




JOST WONDERFUL 
BOOK OF THE AGE 

FREE. 



By the Famons Writer 
on 1 ii-.-ult Sciences, X. 
Lauiotle Sage, A. M., 
Ph. 1)., II- ». For- 
merly Professor. Pierce 
— College, I'luladelphia, 
Pa, NewYorkTnstitnte.NewYork. pupages. Profusely 
11 usfritc.l m*,r,,rl.t.H.< .,"» . rmMfkmc to master ""• 

" ,!■/ "" , ,'io.'< n .;■■ It of HipMXum, M rim, 1'ersonal 

.1/.,,;,,, rum, Jfapu "•' « ataff, and other Occult sciences. 
QUICKEST AND SOREST METHODS OS EARTH. 
You can learn In a few days at your own home and ex- 
ert Hie influence without I lie knoll ledge ot any one. Im- 
possibilities an- unknownSo those who unilers and tie 
marvelous effects of mind control. After reading this 
work you stand amazed at the wonderful opportunities 
before you. It develops the will-power, improves the 
memory, tells you how to lie successful, how to cine dis- 
eases of Sill kinds, how lo eradicate all had liahits from 
tlie system forever. 

You can become a power in your community. 1 011 
mn perform hundreds of startling and thrilling experi- 
ment* and make from Jlo.uo to «-Ju.ou per day. 
We guarantee yon success or forfeit $1,000 in gold. 
READ THIS UNSOLICITED TESTIMONY. 
then write your inline and address on a postal card and 
send for a lice copy ot our wonderful treatise. 

Rev. Paul Weiler, Ihjx 300, Oorham, N. Y.. says: — 
" Your instructions have given me a power and a toree 
Of character 1 did not dream it \ias possihle for me to 
acquire. ' L(n< , oln M j, „>, t -,„t ,-1, t i,-l.l St., Dallas, 
Texas writes;- "The book was a revelation to me. 

Your methods are Ear In advance of anj l have ever 

81 Miss Katherine Measinger, t'orry. l'a., says: — 
" Yoiu' Instruction has made a new woman ot ine. I 09- 
sihilities have lieen opened up that I never dreamed hail 
existed before. Everyone should understand yonrgrana 
science, and there would lie less misery, pool Ilea t i and 
nnhappinesa in the world. Address, Sew iork institute of 

Science, Wept. G 4, Rochester, N. Y. 



XXX11 



ADVEKT1SEMENTS. 



$4,200 Cash! 



For 

Story 

Writers 



2 Prizes $500 each— $1,000 



2 


it 


$300 


ii 


- $600 


2 


ii 


$200 


ii 


- $400 


3 


<< 


$150 


<( 


- $450 


6 


ii 


$125 


ii 


- $750 


IO 


<t 


$100 


ii 


-$i,ooo 



"We will pay $4,200 IN CASH PRIZES as :*bove for original short stories for publica- 
tion in 

The Black Cat 

but no story is eligible for a prize unless it is sent strictly in accordance with the following 
conditions. 

To quote The New York Tribune, "The Black Cat inaugurated a new era in story- 
telling," and in the words of The San Francisco Examiner, " It is the story-telling hit of the 
century.'' It appeals to people who prefer Quality to Quantity, who prefer Originality to 
Commonplace. It publishes no Continued stories, no Translations, no Borrowings, no 
Stealings. It pays the highest price in the world for stories that are stories, and it pays, 
not according to length but according to strength. It pays, furthermore, not according 
to the name or reputation of a writer but according to the cleverness and excellence 
of a storv. 

CONDITIONS: 

1. Each manuscript must bear at the top of the first page the writer's real name and address, in fall, as also 
the number ot words it contains, which may range from i.mmhog.ooo, but most in no case exceed the latter number. 

56. Each manuscript must be plainly written (either on typewriter or with pen) on one sale ot paper only, on 
sheets not larger than Hxii indies, must be sem unrolled, />o*tttoe or exureu chw <r» 1 /»".'/ pwiotd, and accompli 
nfed by addressed and stamped envelope for return. Letter! advising the submittal <>i stories must be enctoseq 
with manuscripts and not sent under separate cover. .Manuscripts will he received ami returned only at the 
writer's risk. 

St. Every Btoi j musl be strictly original and must, neither wholly nor in part, have appeared In print In any 
language. Every story will be Judged on Its own merits; the .name or reputation oi a writer will carrvabso 
lately no weight whatsoever. And furthermore, every story will be nidged* not in accordance with its length, 
hot with iis u uith as a story. 

4. With every manuscript Intended for this $4,200 Prize Competition, there must In- enclosed, in one and the 

same envelope, one yearly subscription to Thk Black Cat, together with so cents to pay then- tor. in ease oi 
subscriptions i o foreign countries M cents musl be added to cover postage 

5. All envelopes containing manuscripts with subscriptions as above must be plainly marked •' For Compe- 
tition * and addressed, " The Bhortstory Publishing Company, ni High Street, Boston. Mass," Their receipl 

will he prompt l v acknowledged. Any competitoi may send as t ij stories as he pleases, but In each case all 

the above conditions must be complied wits. 

O. The competition will close Maud :;i, 1900, and within 60 days from thai date the awards will be announced 
in Tuk Black Cat. and paid in cash. Should two stories of equal merit be considered worthy of a prise, the 
prize will U 1 either doubled or divided. In the case of stories unsuccessful in the competition hut deemed desir- 
able, the publishers will either award special prizes, ot not less than Slim each, or will otfer to purchase the same. 
All unsuccessful manuscripts, submitted as above, will be returned, together with the printed announcement 
of the resultsol the competition. The conditions and requirements being here fully set forth, neither the pub* 
Ushers nor the editor can enter into correspondence relative I hereto. 

I M IM» IC'I'A \T. A§ no manuscript* in the cone of which <'H thr obotM condition* have not been complu tt with 
a- 1 n fi.-> catuieU red, itt* urged that competitor* make sun- that their matwertpt* are ./"'■ jtan d ttrietln In accorda 
theforegainy, arc securely seated in strong < nvetop* *, with the ><■ ■■■ nary < Hetotun i, and went / uttjf prepaid, 

THE SHORTSTORY PUBLISHING CO., Boston, Mass. 




FOR SELLING OUR JEWELRY NOVELTIES. 

Watches, Cameras, Bracelets, Gold Kings, 

Kivenaway ABSOL/TTEI..Y FREE for sellinRour 
Jewelry. No money required. Send us your name 
and lull address on a postal card, and we will send you 18 
lioltl plate scarf ami stick pins, all set with different colored 
stones, to sell lor 10 cents each. The best seller* 
offered by any Arm. When yon have sold thein w« 
will send you your choice of a Watch, a solid Gold Bins 
and any other valuable premium on our large illustrated 
list, which we send you *ith the pins. We pay allpostace 
NOVELTY MFfl. CO.. 62 fiailey St., Attleboro, Mass. 



"V%^^%%^%^^%^%^%%^^%%^%^ 




ADVERTISEMENTS. 



XXX111 



A Good Camera for $2 

NIAGARA No. 2- 

must have to give satisfaction, and more than you 11 
finrtinmanvliiu-li.-i priced cameras. Formerly Mid fot 
$??asl!oo,ias.itnot superior to. any other *5 camera 
sold to-day. 




OUR CHRISTMAS OFFER 



acao e oa a c e o ss Do e seeeo e cccg 

■ 

* 

* 

i 

■ 




Very compact. Carries .9 double plate-hold- 
ers. 'Fitted with a GOOD achromatic lens. 
Has the latest model shutter, adjustable for 
time and instantaneous work. 

Satisfaction is guaranteed. Camera is re- 
turnable in 10 days if you do not find that yon 
have received your money's worth. 

Total cost, $2. including camera complete, one double 
plate-bolder and instruction Iwok. run deseiipme 
matter telling iusl how we can do this-also describing 
the camera in detail— will be sent free on requesl . 

The Niagara Camera C o., Buffalo, New Yor j. 



^Royal Stationery / 

Corrcctlv engraved 
II with your initial or I 

>gram in any one V 

B Styles, tWO •pure- 1 
of the finest writing paper v . 
utc or tint) and 50 envelopes. 
ftojnjn d Jmttai Mon'f/r'n 

lin Plata Colon, * -2*3 •l*Sf ■ 

In fciolu, Silver or Itronze, .£.» |-**>| 
Humiliated: In Two Colors, l.oo i..»o| 

Monogram die becomes your property. 
I Semi in ets< lor our handsome sample book, including! 

litoala nn.l monograms, a full set of souvenir man- 

I ograms, crests, and coati of arm-. Finest quality en- L 

I graved Visiting Cards (including plate) lat ent sty les! 

<-a0earda,76cU.; liH'eard*, 

11.00. Wedding Invita 

x turns and AiinouiKM 

mente e n g ra ved . 
Samples free 

J.' Kovnl K intra v1n« < it. 
\1 s'lHI. SI. rlillailelpliia) 



^y P ^wfiSKn7 T SanyexceUenl Ba^nsamong 

our large assortment of desirable Carriages ol all kinds. 
Stable and Street Howe Blankets a Specialty. Robe*, 

Harness. Horse Goods. John Moore & Co., 
60 Warr-n Street, New Vork, N. *i . Kstaldished 13. t.. 

Write for Catalogue. 



Kay Cameras 

Have achieved an enviable reputation 
for QUALITY and PRICE. 

A complete Folding Camera, 
4x5 size, Carrying Case, Fine 
Shutter and Lens, for $7.00. 

Eclipses anything ever offered for 
the money. 

Send for FREE Circular and Catalogue, 
describing our complete line of 
Hand and Folding Cameras. 

RAY CAMERA CO., 



*J 214 Centre St., 

i *,,, 




FAY 



Rochester, N. Y. $> 
„ f 

STOCKINBS 

For Ladles and Children. 

N'o garters. No supporters. Button to 

waist Up to stay. Most Comfortable. 

.- winter. Best, cheapest ami 

moat durable. The KdeoJ stocking. 
Try them. Children's sizes. tfc. to 46c. 
Ladies*, 50c. and OOc. Satisfaction guar- 
anteed. By mail, postage paid, if not 
sold by your dealer. Circulars free. 

THE FAY STOCKING CO., 62 T St., Elyrla.O, 



B0RATED 
TALCUM 



ENNEI>TS 




^TOILET 



A Positive Relief for 
I Chapped Hands, Chafing, 
T and all afflictions of the skin. 
"Aliltleht<jherinpnce,perhaps 
than worthies substitutes, but a 
reason for it" Delightful after 
shaving. Sold every where, or 
mailed on receipt of 25c. Get 
I ilennen's (the original). .Sample free. 

t.lltll Mtl> MKWKS CO.. Mewnrlt, M. J. 




U/a Uaun Rllilt a national trade on these goods from smokers trying 
IlC ndiC DUIII thorn by mail and Inducing dealers to keep the m. 

ROLLED CICAR 



fall cigar size, box of SO for fcl.'-S prepaid 
to any address. 

LUCRE'S ROLLS 

(Slightly smaller) box of 100 for $1.00, prepaid. 



.tfco 



TOO GOOD TO J. H. LUCKE & CO., Lucks Block, CINCINNATI, OHIO. 

THROW AWAY We guarantee flavor equal to any imported cis ar .old ,n U.S. or money bark. 



DELICIOUS 
TO THE END. 



\ 



XXXIV 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



DISEASE BANISHED. 



Science Takes Another Step Forward. 



It has been known for years that magnetism was an 
important factor in oaring diseases; but not until Pro- 
fessor Thos. F. Adkin, of the New York Institute of Sci- 
ence, made a startling discovery in connection with this 
force did Physicians and Scientists attach such great 
importance as now toils curative powers. 

Professor Adkin, by combining three forces, discovered 
a new force many times more powerful than the old 
force, called human magnetism, or that power used by 
magnetic healers of the present day. Hy Prof. Adkin's 
system, all diseases the human family is heir to can be 
driven from the system forever. All who are sick or 
have snffering friends will hail this news with great joy. 
The most marvelous part of this wonderful discovery is. 
that the life-giving force can be protected to the patient 's 
home. Distance no barrier. No faith required. Cures 
are being made all over the world. A like principle to 
wireless telegraphy is involved in this dUtutit treat- 
ment. 

The results obtained have astonished all who have 
tried it. 

Fre«l «T. Perkins, South Haven. Mich., writes: 
"I suffered with chronic liver and kidney troubles for 
years. My case was pronounced hopeless, when I tried 
Professor Thos. F. Adkin's Vitaopathic distant treat- 
ment. In three weeks all traces of the disease had dis- 
appeared. To-day I am sound as I ever w;is." 

Mr*. Henry Rol>iii*tin, llarmonsburg. Pa. .says: 
"BIy right hand was paralyzed; your absent treatment 
cured it. The effects are marvelous, and I advise any- 
one who is ill to trv your method." 

For full particulars of Ibis wonderful treatment, to- 
gether with a large number of Photographs showing the 
condition of some of the patients In-fore and alter taking 
the treatment, write for the New tteientific ller- 
uM. It tells all about it : how people are cured, etc 

The Herald will be sent to any sufferer »!»»«- 
lutely free. 

iron (ax i,r,vK.\ this method 

and make from 810 to $20 per day. Professor Adkin has 
hundreds of Students In all porta of the world. They are 
meeting with unbounded sin-cress and reaping a harvest 
of money as well as scores of gracious patients. He 
teaches by correspondence or in person; hucc<*«m 
uii;ii';mf col in either case. Address 

Prof. Thos. F. Adkin, Clerk 301, Rochester, N. V. 



DON'T BE HARD UP 



$2,000 A YEAR EASY 
Gold, Silver, Rfcflul ■■«! Jlrtiil 
Plating. Gents anil Ladies ai home 
or traveling, taking orders, uaing and 
selling Prof. Gray** Platers. Plates 
Watches. Jewelry, Tablewar* 1 , Bicycles, 
and all metal goods. No experience, heavy 
plate, modem methods. We do plating, 
manufacture outfits, all siz< s. Guar.in 
teed. Only ninths complete, all tools, 
lathes, materials, etc., ready for work. 
We teach you tbe art, furnish secret* 
Write today. Testimonials, sample*. 
etc. FREE. I. CRAY A CO., PLATINU WORKS 8, ClacbMlL O. 





Patents U S. 

& Europe. 



Dyes all <ffair 



BLACK, 
BROWN 
OR 
BLOND. 

Absolutely Harmless and Lasting. Simple in 
Application. 

Price, by mall, $1.00. 

Semi for catalogue of entirely unique and use- 
ful Parisiau Specialties. 

THE PARISIAN COMB CO., 

530 Broadway, N. Y. 
DEPT. E. 




Women Made Beautiful 



by VI SI ItO. Develop* thn Bust Inches, tills 
all hollow places, adds grace, curve and beauty to 
the neck; softens and clears the skm. Beautiful 
women everywhere owe their superb figure and 
matchless loveliness to VKSTRO. Harmless. 
permanent, XKVKK. FAILS. Every lady 
should have this unrivalled developer. Adds charm 
and attraction to plainest women. Recommended 
by the must prominent physicians. Full particulars, 
pantographs, testimonials, etc., sealed for 2c. stamp 
durum Medicine Co , Dept D.A. 55 State St., Chicago] 



fl LEARN TO HYPNOTIZE! 

f Reader, do you desire to become a Hypnotist? Do you want to know how to utilize the most 
powerful and mysterious force of nature ? Do you value control oyer others ? Do you value the means 
i of securing friendship, love and personal influence T Do you value the power to conquer pain and 
I banish sickness, to reform a misguided friend, to gain business success, to win wealth, position and 
1 happiness? If you do, you must learn to Hypnotize. Why not? No other accomplishment is so easily 
I acquired. It can be mastered in a few hours time, without leaving- your home. It costs nothing ."* 
» to find out all alwaut it. The greatest Hypnotist of the century has just issued in book 
) form a large and exhaustive TREATISE, or Instructor in Hypnotism, covering thef 
» whole ground of his Science, and he will send it while the edition lasts, absolutely 
] FREE TO ALL who apply. The book is profusely illustrated, containing hundreds of 
I beautiful and artistic engravings, and shows as 
I never was done before the principles, features, 
wonders and uses of this mysterious Science, all 
in :i popular and pleasing style. It tells you just 
what Hypnotism is, and what you may accom- 
lisll with it. It shows you tu>w you may sway 
le minds of others, perform astounding ft-ats and 
I Grodace amusement by the hour. New and in- 
I siuntaueous methods. Success absolutely guar- 
1 anteed. Remember, this grand work costs you 
nothing. It benefits everybody who reads it. It places you in touch with the t 
wonder-science of the age. Read it anyhow. It is absolutely FREE. Am 
postal card will bring it by return mail, all charges paid. Apply at once to| 

PROF. L. A. HARRADEN, Box 312, JACKSON, MICH, 





ADVERTISEMENTS. 



XXXV 



MRS. BARNUM'S HAIR 

Una a Fine Npw Growth Fre« of Dandruff— Remarkable 
Success of a Well-known Itemed}-. 

Mrs. Libbie Barnuin of Wolverine, Cheboygan Co., 
Mich, is the happy possessor of a new and natural growth 
of hair. She had been (rowing bald for several years 
but thanks to the wonderful properties ol tin- well-known 
remedies of the Altenheim Sledh-al Dispensary she has 
now entirely recovered her hair and is jubilant as a con- 
sequence. Airs, liarnum says:— "I can heartily assure 
you that I am overjoyed at toe successor the Foe© reme- 
dies. My hair stopped falling out, the bald spots have a 




■■■>■■« 



■—■■———■ 

CURE ! In every sense of the word ! 
Immediate relief, speedy cure. 

Mason's Health Defenders. 

The Yellow Tablets for Dyspepsia are 
prepared from the formula that made 
four physicians famous. 

Their action is marvelous. 

CURE — Remember cure or money re- 
funded. 

30 Tablets, 10c, all druggists; or sent 

for price by the 

H. T. MASON CHEMICAL CO. 

515 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



MRS. LIBBIE BARNTJM. 
nice new growth of hair rive Inches long and there isn't 
B trace « dandruff. I tried the remedy on my eyebrows 
and lashes and they are greatly unproved, l am much 
pleased with the results of the treatment and will highly 
recommend it to anyone who is bald and haadandrnfl and 
other scalp diseases." 

The remedy also cores Itching ami dandruff, sure aigns 
of approaching baldness and keeps the scalp health; and 
vigorous. It also restores gray hair to natural color and 
produces thick and lustrous eyebrows and eyelashes. By 
sending vour name and address to the Altenheim Medical 
Dispensary, SJ4 liuttcriield Iildg., Cincinnati, Ohio, they 
will mail you prepaid a free trial of their remarkable 
remedy. 

HEUMATISM 

cared or no pay. A harmless remedy. 
Box Free. C, H. ROWAN, Milwaukee, Wis. 



HEART DISEASE. 

Some Facts Regarding the Rapid 
Increase of Heart Trouble. 

Heart trouble, at least among the Americans, 
is certainly increasing and while this may be 
largely due to the excitement and worry of 
American business life, it is more often the 
result of weak stomachs, of poor digestion. 

Real organic disease is incurable, but not one 
case in a hundred of heart trouble is organic. 

The close relation between heart trouble and 
poor digestion is because both organs are 
controlled by the same great nerves, the Sym- 
pathetic and Pneumogastric. 

In another way, also the heart is affected by 
the form of poor digestion which causes gas 
and fermentation from half digested food. 
There is a feeling of oppression and heaviness 
in the chest caused by pressure of the dis- 
tended stomach on the heart and lungs, inter- 
fering with their action; hence arises palpi- 
tation and short breath. 

Poor digestion also poisons the blood, mak- 
ing it thin and watery, which irritates and 
weakens the heart. 

The most sensible treatment for heart trou- 
ble is to improve the digestion and to insure 
the prompt assimilation of food. 

This can be done by the regular use after 
meals of some safe, pleasant and effective di- 
gestive preparation, like Stuart's Dyspepsia 
Tablets, which may be found at most drug 
stores, and which contain valuable, harmless, 
digestive elements in a pleasant, convenient 
form. 

It is safe to say that the regular, persistent 
use of Stuart's Dyspepsia Tablets at meal time 
will cure any form of stomach trouble, except 
cancer of the stomach. 

Full sized package of these tablets sold by 
druggists at 50 cents. Little book on stomach 
troubles mailed free. Address, F. A. Stuart 
Co., Marshall, Mich. 

I AniCQTO EMBROIDER 

I 111 1 1 r |i We semi work to your home prepaid. 
LnUlkV Send addressed envelope for one piece 
Of embroidery with prices paid. If our terms or work 
are not to your liking, vou may returu at our expense 
Steady work and good pay. EMPIBK J^MB. 
WOttKs, l»c|»t, i; i i;j« Liberty St„.NewIoi'b 



I a n ico THE CHANCE IS YOURS 

LMUICD FOR PLEASANT HOME WORK. 



ml Particulars bow 
ona secure stead; Income, devoting 

tu pleasant, congenial employment ; 



Send reply I'.nvel 

Inexperienced r 
whole or pari tl 

■AHHATTAH EMB. CO., Wept. t*» Beekmaii St., New York 



CUFFS HELD 

by the Improved I 
Washburne Patent 
Cuff Holder. Can be J 
placed just where you 
want them; will never ! 
Slip, hut ma v be instantly i 
released. Drawers Sup- 
porters easily adjusted 
Or taken off, excellent for 
holding golf trousers, liy 
mail. 20 cents the pair. 
Catalogue showing these 
and other novelties free on request. 
AMERICAN RING CO., Box 76, Waterbury, Conn. 





creates the surprise. In taste they're not 
excelled by anything which can be 

ROLLED CICAR 

full cigar size, box of 50 for $L25 prepaid 
to any address. 

LUCKE'S ROLLS 

(slightly smaller) boxof lOOforJLOO, prepaid. 
J. H. LUCKE 4 CO., Lucko Block, CINCINNATI, OHIO. DELICIOUS 

THROW AWAY. WeguaranteeflavorequaltoanyimportedcigarBOldin U.S.oruioney back. TO THE END. 





XXXVI 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 




No mom'j In ad»anee asked from readers of 



HIGH 
GRADE 



HAIR SWITCHES. 

Finest Quality of Human Hair about One-third 
ordinary prices. 

2oz. 20 inches, to.90 I 3 oz. 24 inches, $2.25 

2 oz. 22 inches, 1.25 3^ oz. 26 inch., 3.25 

2\ oz. 22 inch., 1.40 | 4 oz. 28 inches, 4.50 

Remit five cents for postage. 

All switches are short stem. Send sample 
lock of hair cut near the roots. We can match 
perfectly any hair. All orders filled promptly. 
Money refunded if unsatisfactory. Illustrat- 
ed Catalogue of Switches, Wigs, Curls, Bangs, 
Pompadours, Waves, etc., free. We send 
switches by mail on approval to those who 
mention this paper, to be paid for when re- 
ceived, if satisfactory. Otherwise to he re- 
turned to us by mail. In ordering, write as 
to this effect. Yon ran no risk. We take all the 
ehances. This offer may not be made again. 
ROBERTS SPECIALTY CO., 

114 Dearborn St. (BoyceBldg.J. - CHICAGO. 



{REMNANTS OF 

SILK RIBBONS-most 



MLLE. 
AIMEE'S 



Face Bleach 



Try it First. Pay for it After a Test. 

-^■■BMBv. To demonstrate the remarkable 

lieaulifying effect of Mile. 
Aimee's Face Bleach, we will 
upon reeeipt of 90C. send a sufli- 
cient supply of the preparation to 
thoroughly convince any lady 
that Mile. Aimee's Face Bleach 
is the most remarkable complex- 
ion maker ami the only face 
bleach that absolutely and per- 
manently removes freckles, tan, 
sunburn, pimples, blotches, pm 
worms, blackheads, sallowness, 
crow's feet or any skin eruption 
whatever. It produces a clear 
transparent skin ; Rives a refined, 
fascinating complexion, and en- 
hances a lady's loveliness beyond 
her most extravagant expectations. Do not fail to send 
•20c for sample bottle or 2c. stamp for free book on facial 
beauty, giving all particulars, send to-day. Address, 
AXENE TOILET CO., Dept 31 Masonic Temple, Chicago. 





FREE 




DIAMOND 

STUDDED CASE 



114 KU«M I'lsted Cue, 3 Paris- 
ian Diamonds* Rubies Jeweled 
American inurement, accurately 
regulated .item wind ami Set. 
Warranted 20 years. 

Sent C.O.D. #5.95 

wiili privilege of examination. 
Do not take from the eipresa 
tbink this watch is not equal 
9 to a |50 Watch. Mention 
r ne*rc8t*Mpress office. Ladles' or Genu'. 
Agents & salesmen coin big monej. Address 
KAGLE WATCH CO., 66 Maiden Lane, Sew York. 



We have 
purch- 
ased, at 
recent 
w h ole- 
sale auc- 
tion sales 
se ve r al 
large lots 
of Rem- 
nants of 
Silk Rib- 
bons, at 
prices 
w h ich 
will en- 
able our 
lady cus- 
tomers to 
secure 
splend i d 
bargains. 
These 
remnants 
are alt 
from one 
to two 
and three 
yards in 
length, 
andmany 
of them 
are the 
fi nest 

quality of Ribbons in the market, of different widths, in 
a variety of fashionable shades; in fact, nearly all colors are 
represented; also different kinds of Ribbons adapted for 
bonnet strings, neckwear, trimming for hats and dresses, 
bows, scarfs, etc., etc. No lady can purchase such fine Rib- 
bons as these at any store in the land for many times our 
price, so that the bargains offered by us should be taken 
advantage of by our customers. 

Our stock of Silk Ribbons, from which we put up these 
35-cent packages, consists of Crown Edge, Gros Grain, 
Moire, Picot Edge, Satin Edge, Silk Brocade, Striped Otto- 
man, and various other styles of Flain and Fancy Silk Rib- 
bons suited to the wants of our lady friends. 

We put up carefully assorted packages of these Ribbons, 
assorted colors. No remnants less than one yard long, 
and all first-class, useful goods. 

We will send 1 package for 35 cents, silver, or 36 cents 
in 2-cent stamps. Carefully packed in boxes, postpaid, 
upon receipt of price. Address PARIS RIBBON 
CO., Box 3045 , Nqw York City, N. Y. 



m $ m 



-CURABLE 



rite for Free Book 

llfODIETItEATMEIfT 

Knife, Plaster, 

B.C MASON MEDICAL CO., 121 W. 42c! St.. New York. 



THE NATURAL BODY BRACE 

CURES AILMENTS PECULIAR TO WOMEN 

COSTS YOU NOTHINC TO TRY IT. 



WORN WITH OR WITHOUT CORSET. 

Endorsed by Every Physician Who Has Used It. 



All this is within your reach. 
Our Brace will do the work. 
Let us tell vuu how in our 
illustrated hook mailed free 
in plain sealed envelope. witli 
letters from delighted cus- 
tomers. Write for it to-day. 



BE COMFORTABLE 

BE HEALTHY AND STRONG 

BE MORE ATTRACTIVE 

WORK AND WALK WITH EASE 
The following letter is one of many thousands: 
Curtis. Miss., Sept. 1,1898. "The Brace I purchased of you 
two years ago did all that you claimed font. It cured me 01 
the worst formsof female weakness-prolapsus, ovarian trou- 
bles, heartache, hearing down pains, constipation, inflamma- 
tion and other things of 90 years' standing. I can never say 
enough in praise of the dear old Brace, since it has cored me 
afterspending hundreds of dollars for nie<loM^eai].nh.cn.rs 

MONEY REFUNDED IF BRACE IS NOT SATISFACTORY. 

Address THE NATURAL BODY BRACE CO., BOX 50, Salina, Kansas. 
Every woman anticipating motherhood shouldhave this Brace. 



tins 



SIMPLE IN CONSTRUCTION — COMFORTABLE — ADJUSTABLE TO ANY FICURE. 



ADVKRTISEMENTS. 



XXXV11 




KOTEDSILK 

UNDERWEAR 

For Men and Women 



KOTEDSILK 



♦ 



TRADE MARK - REGlSTEREt 



Coated on the inside with Pure Silk. 
Persons to whom wool is unpleasant 
can wear Kotedsilk with comfort. 
It is light, warm, durable, non-irritat- 
ing, easily washed, does not shrink. 



Men's Shirts, . . 34-44, $2.50 each 

" Drawers, . 28-44, 2.50 " 

" Union Suits, 34-44, 5.00 " 

" Undervests, 34-44, 2.00 " 

Ladies' Short Underskirts, 



Ladies' Vests, . . 26-40, $2.50 each 

" Drawers, . 26-40, 2.50 " 

" Union Suits, 26-40, 5.00 " 

« Underwaists, 26-40, 2.00 " 

. 24-32 waist, . . $2.50 



If your dealer can't supply you, <we 'will. Express prepaid 

WRITE FOR BOOKLET 

KOTEDSILK UNDERWEAR CO. 

Millbury, Mass. 
And 76 Leonard Street, New York City 




XXXV111 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



STERICK'S SPECIFIC 

THE GREATEST LINIMENT ON EARTH 

For Rheumatism, Neuralgia, Sciatica, Sprains and all 
other aches and pains. Clean— Clear— Fragrant — good 
for the complexion and fine liair tonic. Try it and be 
convinced. Ask your druggist for it, or send by mail. 
Price 35 cents. (Exceptionally stubborn cases solicited.) 
Full particulars, testimonials, etc., for 96, siainp. 

H. J. STERICK Sl CO., 

tiaitheraburg, Md. 



GREAT BARCMNSi'NECKWEAR 



CLUB BOWS, different and separate neck- 
ties, the very latest, pretty colors, sent post- 
pald5for20c.,15for45c. SstyltshSILK bows j 
25c. .justtointrodnce our popular neckwear. J 
How to tie neckwear. Calander and larpe 
Catalogue free with each order. ERNST,. 
MFU. CO., 1161 First Ave,, New York City. 



_ MAS OM'S 

CrEAMofQLIVES OINTMENT 



CURES CATARRH ASTHMA HAY FEVER 
■ MUMPS.CROURCAKED BREAST. 
•• FIRE&SUN BURN CHAFING. 
• •.■ BUNIONS&TIRED FEET. * 
» ■ CHAPPED FACE. LI PS & HANDS 
•• » SAFE REMEDY FOR PILES. 
ALL DRUGGISTS or MAILED FOR 25* 
HTMASON CHEMICAL C0 5I5ArchStPhii»Pi 



SAFE SPEEDY-SURE S 



Free sample mailed on receipt of 2c. stamp. 




nTlrTAHYSmESETTTMO if 
7*w Fod LAOitS ... 
ITIOVMTAD WITH 
1 K .PJAKOWP. 



\fSOKX\HCt DIAMOND _ 
■\rbP*Z QUABTX FROM 

J WHICH THEBOUVIAM . 

.ANDES DlArtOMpJi" ' " 



BOLIVIAN AnDE^DiAHONDs. 



A DIAMOND RING THAT WILL 
STAND THE TEST OF TIME. 

A diamond that xcill not wear glassy. 

A ring that icill nut wear brassy. 
Bolivian Andea Diamonds are cut from Diamond 
Topaz tiuartz, mined in the Andes Mountains. Bo- 
livia, South America. Equal in every way to the 
genuine diamond— the same finish, the same lustre, 
the same brilliancy and the same fiery, blue-white; 
color— the only perfect substitute ever discovered. 

Lady's Ring. mo " n ^Zt 1K $1.00 
Gentleman's Ring, 1'" K.'diamoud, $1.50 

FORWARDING CHARGES PREPAID. 

If upon examination, you find the slightest mis- 
representation, money will be refunded cheerfully 
and promptly. 

BOLIVIAN ANDES DIAMOND CO., 

54 N. Thirteenth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Eindly mention this paper. 



1 




REDUCED TO $4.50. 

To place our best #10.00 TOLEDO i 
BAT1I CABINET in every home we I 
Bend it complete for 80 days with best I 
alcohol stove, directions, formulas to I 
any address upon receipt of |4.50. Face I 
Steamer 75c extra. Order today. Ours I 
best of all Cabinet-, has real door, steel I 
frame, top curtains, rubber lined, folds I 
flat 1 in. Bpace. Money refunded after I 
80 days use if not just as represented. \ 
It's a home necessity. Turkish and 
vapor baths 3c each prevent disease, 
cure without drags colds, la grippe, 
rheumatism, female ills, all blood, skin, kiuney, ner- 
vous troubles. WRITE FOR CATALOtU E FREE. 
We make Cabinets from $2.35 up* Aee-nts Wanted. 
Easy terms. Exclusive territory. TOLEDO BATH 
CABINET CO., 614 Cherry St., TOLEDO, OHIO. 
[The above firm are responsible and do as they agree. — Editor.] 





Utt cent*. 

linn great vanishing 
half Dollar trick. Hlce Moustau-tie or Goa!<-e. Pull Board. 
Rub*, Irish or Side Wblskera. an v color, bottle Spirit Oum 
to Mick whiskers, etc Box of Bonn Cork to ~ 
1 blacken up. l-ocomotlv« orDeiectivo Whla- 
h _ jift, . tie, Cure for love, a noveltysore to please. 
IMF?*? Coin through tbehat trick, Iro.anake.20 in. 
™ long In ((lass covered cabinet toscarewhls- 
V/q"v/ i ""4 l key drinkers. Imitation robber mouth, big 
'"°* teeth, appears from earto ear. Wrttewhere 
you saw this ad. and I will send a An. id 
(Joi.d laid Anger Ring, Free, send size. 
This big oder Is lo gel your address lo send 
my large 111. catalogue free, of new Plays, 
Wigs Tricks. Novel ilea. Jewelrv etc. akIv Wanted Address. 
Chat, E. M»r*b*U, Mfr., I.yiUpyrt, If , V. 

PQPP To introduce our Inrge 

■ l\CC Illustrated Catalogue 

of Jewelry and Novelties we will send 

^^- this beautiful Egcria Diamond Ring 

Sfi^X. FREEI Strnd ten cents to pay for 

. . i \ \ N )f postage and packing. Send size. 

Fairwood Supply Co., Dept. b.c 237 Lroadway, New York 




Too Fat 

We will send full information about how 
to make a simple herbal remedy at home 
to reduce your weight, and also a sample 
box securely sealed. In a plain wrapper 
free by maif, to any one Bending 4 cents 
f..r postage, etc. Coats you nothing to 

try it. Address, 
HALL CHEMICAL CO., K. A. Box, St, Louis, Mo. 




A CHRISTMAS GIFT. 

Every Christmas we make 
the attic folks a Christmas pres- 
ent. This year we have some- 
thing nice and pretty. To in- 
troduce our Family Magazine 
m every homej we 6end, free 
ofeharge, if you will Gend 
lOc, for nonage,*? I*retty 
Dolls, with beautiful life-like 
features ; one little boy and two 
girl diKls, with complete dressea 
fur each. 

SOClAlTVlSlTOR DOLL DEPARTMENT, 
Box 3139. BOSTON, MASS. 





LADIES 




DUTY 
TO BE 

Loveliness of the faee 
form can be obtained and retained i 
by USUM l'KOF. I'.MCDs; 
(-RKAM OF ALMOMrS' 
which for years has been endorsed by 
iiottMl women whose superb beauty fascinates the 
opposite sex and is the marvel and envy of the less fortunate 
women who, if they will, can secure this prlceleu boon 
for only the asking. We positively guarantee Prof. Jtird's 
i renin of Almonds to permanently cure pimples, 
free k let*, moth, sallowness, ronchness, wrin- 
kles, tan, blaekheads, reilness, flahhiness, uu 
all irritations and Imperfections of the skin, lace, 
neek, bust, arms and hands. We Bend you gladly a 
trial treatment absolutely free with full directions and 
testimonials. Our remedy is perfectly harmless, safe 
an<! sure. Don't wend one eent of money, but 
write your name and address plainly and be sure to mention 
this paper. Everything confidential. Address The Bihu 
Chemical Co„ 04 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. Dept. d. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



HAYNERS 

PURE WHISKEY 

DIRECT FROM DISTILLER 
TO CONSUMER. 

4 FULL QUARTS 

1 EXPRESS CHARGES PREPAID, 

1 For $3,20 

. 5AVES MIDDLEMEN S PROFITS, 
i. PREVENTS ADULTERATION . 



Caution\ 

[S«e that eachl 
fettle bears cj 
iii]nature overJ 
'fcjhc Cork. 




HAYNERS 

SEVEN YEAR OLD 




: T HE HAYNER iDlStlLLlMG C0,| 

" ; - DISTILLERS *nd IrtPORTtRS.-*- 
DAYTON, OHIO, U.S.*- 



SINCE 1866 

Havner's pure double copper distilled Rye Whiskey has 
been sold to consumers direct from our own distillery, 
known as "Hayner's Registered Distillery No. 2, Tenth 
District." No other distillers sell to consumers direct. 
Those who offer to sell you whiskey in this way are spec- 
ulators who buy to sell again, by which plan they are 
compelled to add a profit which you can save by buying 
from us direct. f 

We will send four full quarts of Hayner s 
Seven-Year-Old Double Copper Distilled Rye 
Whiskey for $3.20, express prepaid. We snip 
on approval in plain, sealed boxes, with no 
marks to indicate contents. When you receive 
it and test it, if it is not satisfactory return it 
at our expense and we will return your $3.20. 
Such whiskey as we offer you for $3.20 cannot be 
purchased elsewhere for less than $5.00, and the low 
price at which we offer it saves you the addition of 
middlemen's profits, besides you are guaranteed the cer- 
taintv of pu re whiskey absolutely free from adulteration. 
KEFEi!ENCES:-Third National Bank, any business 
fcouse iu Davton or Commercial Agencies. 

THE HAYNER DISTILLING CO., 
■nfifiMBLlE c s oT.:va... h->* Sffi" 

Ore", l-Uh7wash..Wyo.. must call for 20 qts. by freight, prepaid. 



, f i^ J .^.//.^r^-w^--jy/gqT 



"We guarantee the above firm to do as it agrees to.-EDiTOR. 



xl 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



1900 

Do you want a Calendar? 

Do you want a handsome Calendar? 

A Calendar that is made for the home, and not for the 

office ? 

A Calendar that is ornamental and that will look well in 

any house ? 

A Calendar that you will enjoy every time you look at it ? 

A Calendar of six parts, each part different from the 
other, yet forming a beautiful and handsome series ? 

A Calendar printed in eleven colors from original 
designs, mounted on an extra heavy mat, 14 x 17 inches, 
that keeps it in shape and prevents the corners from 
curling ? 

A Calendar that costs us 36 cents each, delivered, and 
that would not be sold in the stores for less than one dollar ? 

An End of the Century Calendar of a limited edition, of 
which no more will be printed ? 

We have a Calendar of this kind ; if you want one, 
send five two cent stamps to Mellin's Food Company, 
291 Atlantic Avenue, Boston, Mass. 

We know you will like it ; we will refund the money if 
you are not satisfied. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



xli 



"•Wooden 



Price 87. Heat and mois- 
ture regulation and yen- 
I ■ ^Sk tilation, absolute- 
per- 
fect. 
A 
book 
about 
the 
Wooden 
, Hen, and 
one about 

the Excelsior Incubator, will be sent 
free to any one naming this paper. 
GEO. H. STAHL, Quincy, III. 



I {3; 




el 

ehmdjheforce 

is the educated mind which plana 
and directs the work of others. 

You can rise to a higher position 
.without interrupting your work 

' or leaving home. You can get 

A Technical 
Education 

BY MAIL. 

„ c bne prepared succesjf.d Mechanical 
or Architectural Hrauttht-mcn, , Elec- 
trlcal or Steam Knplaecr., Archi- 
tects. Surveyors, t'hcnn»t». t »"<■»• 
pondents, Stenographer" una Book- 
keepers. Write for circular. Mention 
the profesiion you wish to enter. 
The International Correspondence School! 
Box 11 J»S, Scranton, Pa. 



■ ■_ i^ -, r D^aaI/ wholly different from coarse and 
IY13Q6 OT OlOCK flavorless Domestic tobaccos^ 

ROLLED CICAR 

fnll cigar size, box of 50 for $1.25 prepaid 
to any address. 

LUCKE'S ROLLS 

(slightly smaller) box of loo for $1.00, prepaid. 
J H. LUCKE & CO., Lucke Block, CINCINNATI, OHIO. delicious 

THROWA WAY Wegn«ra;tee„a,ore q naltoanyimportedci S .r K »ldmU.S.ormon«yb«k. TO THE END. 






SOMETHING NEW! ! 

This little machine does 
' the finest grades of ein- 
broiderUig now done by 
> band. Kinhroiderson any 
\ fabric; uses embroidery 
5 silk or cotton; achild can 
^operate it; an Independ- 
/ent living can he made 
1 witli it at lioine. Asa >pe- 
cial introductory offer we 
will Bend a sample ma- 
chine with a full set of 
Stamping patterns and a 
.^b— fci=^- beautiful sample of em- 

broider? together with full instructions teaching bow 
tmi' ii "r 60e prepaid- regular price. $2.00. 
a 'i, na"c book of embroidery designs, containing up- 
wards of 1 ill' stratum*, lice Willi each machine. 
Agents wanted. GEM MFG. CO., Oept. T.St. Louis, Mo. 



HOW CONVENIENT AND COZY! 



STAR of CARTER 



Underwear for 
[LADIES/ CHILDREN/^ 

"Star of Garter" Ribbed [[Q] 
i WoolenUndenrearlsas | 
I Sanitary or Hygienic as I 
I the most high-priced ad- 
I vcrtlscd specialties and 
I at one-third their cost. 




COMBINATION CENTRE TABLE 



AND WRITING DESK,,:^ ^^' 

.. ,w l..hai ■nnOH i"vU»n«i(>ii Wl'l 



, l4(W vest and pants. $1.00 each: 

I cwnbtrraiion suits. $2 .00. Fine merino wool 

I —while or gjar — elastic— perfect fittings 

1 non-urllaiing— will noi shrink. II your dealer" 

' cannot supply you. we will on receipt ot 

price. Catalogue and sample* ol tabrtct 

mailed tree. If you cut out ant mail (hit 

■fttfcrUKmeni to i 



HOOSICK FALLS 
HOSIERY CO. 

TROY. N. T. 



..oak, 80 Inches higf.. 
,i,~-r, inches square. Extension w riting shell 16 1 » 
Lnchee; with pigeonholes tor stationery.whicb can 
be closed « ben not In use. Heavy 1 rencb legs and 
hand carved on all sides. Hand- p r | pp CO 1£ 

so'ncly nnislicd in Golden dak or rTICB »B./q 
M ihogany. We prepay freight east of Mississippi 
fiver and north of the ('arolmas \\ e sell direct 
from factory to household, savtag the purchaser two 
nrotits. Absolute satisfaction guaranteed. If not 
as represented return at our expense, and money 
will be refunded. Our references. The \\ est ( lei-e- 
land and Lake Shore Banking Cos. Send for onr 
lustrated.'atalogtieof latest designs..! line furni- 
ture specialties. Cleveland t al.inct Co., 
330 Erie St., Cleveland, O. 



xlii 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Make your friend a Christmas Present that will last him All the Year ! 

Any Man or Boy 
Who Loves Nature 

Or who is interested in Legitimate Sports and Pastimes such as 

Hunting-, Boating, Athletics, 

Fishing, Camping*, Amateur Photography, 

or who desires the 

Protection and Preservation of our Game and Song: Birds 

will derive a world of pleasure, useful knowledge and profitable hints from reading 

Recreation 



(Founded and Published by G. O. Shields 
■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■•■■■■■■■■■■■■■■> llliaiaiaitl>L V 



Recreation 

and 

The Black Gat 



Trad« Mirk. 




Bothl year $1. 



Pres. League American Sportsmen.) 

Recreation is an illustrated monthly 
magazine devoted to Everything its Name 
Implies, and is a recognized Authority. 

Holiday "Recreation" Offer! 

Realizing that every true sportsman 
keenly enjoys Fascinating Tales, clever= 
ly told, the publisher of RECREATION 
is gratified to announce that he has com= 
pleted arrangements whereby he is 
enabled to offer a full year's subscription 
to THE BLACK CAT, " The Story* 
telling Hit of the Century," and a full 
year's subscription to RECREATION 
for the remarkably low sum of $J.OO. 
In other words for $1.00 sent under this 
offer, before January, J 900, to RECRE= 
ATION, a copy of THE BLACK CAT 
(costing 50 cents a year) and a copy of 
RECREATION (costing $1.00 a year) 
will be mailed, postpaid, a full year to 
any address in the United States or 
Canada. Persons availing themselves 
of this Special Holiday Offer may have 
THE BLACK CAT sent to one ads 
dress and RECREATION to another. 



I MPORTANT.-All orders sent under this special offer must be accompanied by |1.(» 
in draft, postal or express order or stamps, and addressed Recreation, 19 West 24th 
Street, New York. 

»» ♦♦♦♦»♦♦ MM * »»•>•♦ ♦ 



ADVEUTISEM BNTS. 



xliii 




v - fOld Barton Pure Rye. 1 



r 



COPYRIGHT APPI-rET> FOR. 



SPECIAL— Toshowtheperfect confidence wefeel 
lathe superior quality of Old Baktok Pure Rye, 
to any one who doubts, we will send, tiy express, 
prepaid, one full quart bottle, on receipt of H.OO. 



c Kind That Won Kentucky Fame 

old-fashioned kind, from the heart of the Blue Grass 
reeionof Kentucky, made like it was 100 years ago. when 
quality was the thing, resulting in a fully matured, rich 
flavored distillation, in its original purity, and forming an 
ideal stimulant at all times. Ask any Kentuckian. As a 
protection atrainst imitations, OLD Barton Pvue Rye Is 
put up for the U. X. only in our original and beautiful 
" \ bottles with wire netting, and closed with our lead teal. 

\ NEVER BOTTLED UNDER 10 YEARS OLD 

While Old Barton POM Kfl has never been sold for less 
than $15.00 per case, yet to intr 0(Il „. e quickly wn .f 1 re , u ."' 
known and to save c\-"co Pe of Middleman, we wm sm P» 
FROM DISTILLERY TO PURCHASER. "» r ,ain 
case, one dozen full quart bottles, by express, prepaid; on 
receipt of 810.00. or rase of six full quarts on receipt of B>.uu. 
Each case equipped with cork-screw and neat glas s. 

Note the following broad guarantee: WJeri re- 
ceived, onen and test if not perfectly satisfactory, 
money promptly refunded. 

REFERENCES: Postmaster. Agent Adams Express Co., 
Fayette National Rank, all of Lexington, K? 






NOTE— Orders from States west of the Rockies, 
most call for twenty-four quarts, by freight, 
prepaid. 



Address, and Make All Drafts, Etc., Payabl 

R. S. STRADER & SON 

DISTILLERS, 
58 Water Street, LEXINGTON, KY 

AGENTS WANTED. 





&<& WANT a BARGAIN? £? 



MAGIC 



WISH to sell? 
ANTERNS 

HARBACH4CO.809FilbertStPhila.Pa. 



A $5 Printing Press 

Prints nil your own cards, labels, circulars' 
1 1.' Saves v«m money. Send lor catnlnu'"i' 
to makers, IvELSEY '& CO., Meriden, Conn. 





EVERY MAN 



who tries them finds these goods an astonish 
ment in their tropic-raised fine rich flavor, 

ROLLED CIGAR 

full cigar size, box of 50 for $1.25 prepaid 
to any address, 

LUCKE'S ROLLS 

(Slightly smaller) box of 100 f or S1.00, prepaid. 
J H LUCKE & CO., Lucke Block, CINCINNATI, OHIO, DELICIOUS 





A RAPID AND SCIENTIFIC 
METHOD OF MUSCLE BUILDING 
F0RTHE ATHLETE OR INVALID,' 
STUDENT OR BUSINESS MAN. 



SEND 4 CENT STAMP 
FOR DESCRIPTIVE CIRCULAR. 

, -♦ ADDRESS—*- 

STRENGTH.Dept. B. Box 722. 
HARTFORD , CONN. 



xliv 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



hitely 

^ JExercisei 



V 



A Daily Necessity to 

Every Man and 
Woman of Sedentary 
Habits. 

Expands chest, strengthens 
lungs, develops arms, takes 
that stoop out of the should- 
ers, brings perfect physical 
development. The Standard 
Exerciser of the World. 
P"ces-88, *3, »■* and 
1*5. Over half a million 
nsers. Recommended by 
Physicians everywhere. 



Special -Xntn* Offer. 

Upon receipt of price we 
will forward one machine 
prepaid to any address, 
and will refnnd money on 
s return if unsatisfactory 



10 Cents 8j?S &'SpE5! 

cnl Education." by Prof. 
JV. G. Anderson, of Yale' 
125th thousand. Gur new art 
catalogue is free. 

WHITELY EXERCISER CO., 

31 Marine Bldg., CHICAGO. 



mam 




WSMm 



i&fojrjitteSfk'ffa 



■• - ■ ■ ■ ' *..■*>-■..... 



Battery Hanging Lamps,$10.00 & 
Telephone, complete, . 5.95 =■ 
Electric Door Bells, , . 1.00 
Electric Carriage Light, S 95 
Battery Fan Motor, . . 6.95 
Electric Hand Lanterns, 2.00 
Pocket Flash Lights, . 1.50 R 
Miniature Electric Lamps, .40 
$8 Medical Batteries, . . 8.95 
Genuine Electric Belts, . l.OO 
JJ2 Belt with Suspensory, 2.50 
Genuine Electric Insoles, .25 
Telegraph Outfits, , . . 2.25 
Battery Motors from $1 to 12.00 
Battery Table Lamps, , 8.00 
Necktie Lights, 75cts. to 8.00 
<t> Bicycle Electric Lights, 2.75 
Electric Cap Lights, . • 1.75 
Electric Railway, . . , 2.95 
Battery Student Lamp, . 4.00 
Dry Batteries, per dozen, 2.25 
All Electrical Books at low 
prices. 
We undersell all on Everything 
Electrical. 

OHIO ELECTRIC WORKS 

OLEVELAND. O. 

Headquarters for Elactrio Nov- 
elties and Supplier. 

Agents wanted. Send for Hew 
Catalogue- just out. 



We Excel and Undersell All! 

Desk Lamp and Battery .... $3.75 
$4.00 Electric Bicycle Light . . . 2.25 

Sewing Machine Motor .... 8.00 

Bend for I atalo ■-•ii- Mlln t. k It, H,t. ,, Novelties, Supplies, 
OHIO H.Hriill WORKS, l .. .el ami, Ohio. 



HE ANGLE LAMP 

"The light lhal never fails' 

Airll.l, bring more sunshine into the honse and drive ont. more trouble than anv otherone 
T T Household article. It completely remedies the trouble and expense of 1 he orrtinarvoil 
«*«. , ',"'> , "V l "''' , "" H ■' thing of the past. It never smokes, smells or gets out of 
order, is lighted and extinguished as easily as uas, and. while giving a light more brilliant 
than gas or electricity, it costs hut 

F.IOnTEEJT (EXTS 
? L'Jf?!", 1 ! ' °. '"V 11 .- ''"like Acetylene gnsand gasolene, which are highly dangerous. The Angle 

•"IV!,. 1."',, '"."'•explosive, gives not even the suspioii f an odor and does not ruin 

a riiioiii!,- oy leaving a deposit around the room. Thousands axe in use in homes, stores, 

w oi'idorf'iU feature of ,i "'"' m ' s - '*'' '•• : "" 1 i,s aU ro " nU '»<=">. together with its 

"\<MM)Klt.SllAPIHV' 

"'s'rVT"™!? fw "' e liKl> ' falunt >' directly downward, have called fortli tmre- 

tllKISlilAS BIPT IT IS IDEAt, 

V^hmvi!!*,!^!' 1 ', 1 lK ;"" i *" 1 - «'e will gladly send catalogue 
\ show ing all styles from §1.80 up. 

THE ANCLE LAMP CO., 

TO P»rk Pl«re, s,» Tork. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



xlv 




Great Strength 
and Development 

^Aa«^W--■ i,- " ,,l 

The Kallithenos Club 

"THE CLUB WITH LIFE IN IT." 

strength and •^"^^'"conUol of boTh muscle and brain, .thus 
:^ZTi^or/^o%r^°iuy sudden emergency requiring 

Jt wears out "fat' and su ^J 1 "^* Zlf.conirol of both body and 
It imparts life, ^ the ^ e fi ^3 \ W eak, contracted lungs, 
brain. Doctors commend it Ughly for wea, ^^ Qf 

ONLY ONE CLUB IS ^"-fjnished two handles-" spade" 
aluminum. With ^ch club are furn.sheui ^ stee , g? . 

and straight-three nickel plated weigni , Kallithenos Club ad- 
These are all > nterchan e* a k b ' e r strong man. woman or child 
aPt ^l1te ?o7?"u S raUd ak ci°rculLrrwith price and introductory 

offers. r 1 C* 

Cfte Kallithenos CcDept. fl, 71 eagle St., 

A Few Good Agents will be Appointed. 



BUFFALO, N. Y. 




-i-ur-cc: r AAHC >™ a P leasin < ! astonishment Quick it 
THESE GOOUO of rich tropic-grown stock, bought for 



made— but 
a song.' 



ROLLED CICAR 

full cigar size, box of BO for $1.25 prepaid 
to any address. 

LUCKE'S ROLLS 

(glighUj smaller) boxof looforSl.00, prepaid. 





RHttNS 







,,U,.o, beneflt They 1-hg f^ffi?"* 
the package andaccep • - ,"' ,: iU I* mailed to 



Sllllll^liiss 



,ackiB= ° f BBAUT1FUU 
™IUS SII.H ««.. BoxS045,!.e.V>rkOH]-,&. l- 



^ 





Where Schlitz Beer is Aged 

SCHLITZ beer is stored tor months in these refrigerating rooms 
before it leaves our brewery. There are four million cubic 
feet of air in these rooms, kept at a temperature of 34 degrees. 
Storage capacity, 265,000 barrels. 
This is an expensive process in the making of good beer, but a 
beer that isn't well aged isn't well fermented, and the result is a 
"green beer" — the kind that makes you bilious. 

Aging is only second to purity. It saves the sick headaches 
resulting from cheap beer. It forms one reason why your physician 
always recommends Schlitz, the health beer that made Milwaukee 
famous. Not only absolutely pure, but always well fermented. 

THPTIfiNAPV PDFP 'We will send you a 200-page up-to-date Webster Pocket Dictionary upon 
IF1V 1 lUn AI\ 1 1 1\L,I< j rece |p, f two-cent stamp to pay postage. Address SCHLITZ, Milwaukee. 



RKHILL & CO, 



INTERS, BOSTON U.S.A. 



xlvi 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



t-AJvj^ 



-s**sst 



he ram ily Circle 



V 



■'PRUDENTIAL 

MAS THE . 

STRENGTH OF ft 
GIBRALTAR j 

I 

^: 

■"-'■i.-ffi£n 



*k? 



¥ 



f rotc byTHE?RUDENTIAL 



THE various plans of policies, Ordinary, Intermediate and Industrial, issued by 
The Prudential, embrace every member of the family, from one year old to 
seventy, and in amounts from $15 to $100,000. All in good health may secure 
Life Insurance proportionate to their needs and purchasing ability. 

Write for full information and description of policies for profitable investment and protection. 

THE PRUDENTIAL INSURANCE COMPANY 

JOHN F. DRYDEN, President. OF AMERICA HOME OFFICE: NEWARK, N.J. 

(Please mention this publication.) 




a cocoa 





UNEQUALLED F&R EATING. DRINKING a COOKING 

PREMlUMTl fc^ 

- „, - ^aw — »^" r^L 

f}CHOCOLATE 

FOR DRINKING. COOKING. CREAMS 85 



/aB8M B CHOCOLATES. 

UNSURPASSED 

GROCEKS EVERYWHERE. 



FOR PURITY OF MATERIAL 
FOR OELICI0U5KES5 OF FLAVOR 




YftlGHT ISOB.BV 
G EO. P.BENT. CH 



"The One of many Tones." 

Other Pianos are" Single-toned " Instruments. 

No other like it. No other equal to it. 

<( CfClW/n " ^' ano * s lrie highest type of the 
VIuWll modern pianoforte. It stands 
squarely on its merits and courts the most critical exam- 
ination and closest comparison. It is sure to please and 
satisfy you. Warranted 10 years, and warrant is "Burnt 
in the back " of each instrument. Write for catalogue 
with music free. Bent makes " Crown " Churchand 
Parlor Organs too. Catalogue for the asking. 

GEO. P. BENT, Manufacturer, 
Bent Block. Chicago, Illinois, U. S. A. 




,S8 



thk two i.kiii'.m: PRHFUMR8 of the season. Tliest- perfumes are <i"irii- 1 

essences The' are Ave I imesaa delicate and pnngentaa most perfumes known 

hCTetofwe: SneSmtle drop yields the iraimu n uquetyT flowers. Sotttn^rddr^oreappropriat, 

.-.t t<.r m n..ii,i~v i-n.—,.. than these exquisite new perfrunes. Tte daintmM and beanrj Mlhepack 
MniniAheaenerfumeahaTeexcited univeis.il admiration m r.msiun sm-n-iy. ."""I every where, 01 
ffle R se5^P^n*r2cS e pt e of ...... Add**. ^"^^Sh^et ^& V. 



ZH 




OVKB 



108,000 



NOW IN C8K. 



MpIANOS?«K 



Wuiio and Factor!**: 

41 7 433 West 28th St 

New York.